Why do people believe 911 was a conspiracy?

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bluegray (October 17, 2006, 09:14:42 AM):
People usually like to believe weird things because they need to. It fills some emotional gap or creates a sense of belonging to something or some group. I can understand that people will want to believe in warm fuzzy things like going to heaven or the easter bunny, but I have trouble figuring out just what's in it for people to believe that the WTC was demolished by the US government and not terrorists.

Any thoughts?
Mefiante (October 17, 2006, 11:39:19 AM):
At the risk of stating the obvious, conspiracy theorists are usually completely hooked on confirmation bias without being aware of it. Just about any fact can be suitably bent to fit in with the theory, and thus provide further "confirmation."

I suspect that the basic motivation for believing in conspiracy theories is much the same as that for believing in a personal god and devil: essentially, so that one can declare, "It's not my fault!" when something bad happens.

When things go wrong in our lives or with our plans, it is comforting to "know" that these happenings were beyond our control, and also how to avoid a recurrence of them in the future. We are blameless if something bigger than us is responsible for our misfortune, something we cannot possibly hope to exert any influence over. When, in addition, we can assign to that agent a deliberately evil or destructive agenda, our own innocence seems even more unblemished, we seem even less culpable, and we can denounce it with even greater confidence, justification and righteousness.

In a nutshell, "Don't look at me - I'm OK. But just look at what they have done! Shocking."

And, no, I don't know how to begin addressing such a mindset.

(My 64 cents' worth, if it matters at all, comes from many interactions with a close relative who is a conspiracy nut. >:( )

'Luthon64
qrios (October 17, 2006, 14:45:35 PM):
Even though I agree in principle with what Luthon64 is saying(I actually find it quite plausible, and a good viewpoint old chap...), I feel he might be generalising a bit....

A lot of things can be considered conspiracies, even by those who were not involved at all, or those who could not really care about who is to blame....

Then again, in hindsight, some things are a just to weird to be coincidental....
http://www.davidicke.com/content/category/6/19/33/
Why would David Icke lie about a thing like that?? ;D ;D

Me, I'm still trying to find out If I can drink TAB or Sprite Zero because of the Asparteme conspiracy.. ::)

http://www.dorway.com/badnews.html
bluegray (October 17, 2006, 15:50:55 PM):
A lot of things can be considered conspiracies, even by those who were not involved at all, or those who could not really care about who is to blame....

If you believe it, then you are getting involved and do care. Which is why I want to understand the motivation behind the belief. Even if you are not directly involved.

Then again, in hindsight, some things are a just to weird to be coincidental....
http://www.davidicke.com/content/category/6/19/33/
Why would David Icke lie about a thing like that?? ;D ;D

Coincidence in itself proves nothing. And why wouldn't David Icke lie? There is a lot of reasons he might choose to do so. And even if he genuinely believes what he is saying, it does not prove him right.

Me, I'm still trying to find out If I can drink TAB or Sprite Zero because of the Asparteme conspiracy.. ::)

http://www.dorway.com/badnews.html
Now this I can understand. It will effect you personally if it turns out to be harmful, so caution is in order. But being careful is different from accusing the parties involved as being part of a conspiracy.
Mefiante (October 17, 2006, 16:01:52 PM):
When some people, who are not directly involved in some event, also believe that there is a conspiracy about that event, this is really just a further bit of confirmation bias on the part of people who are prone to believing in conspiracies: "Look, there's another conspiracy! The fact that it exists is more proof that all the other conspiracies I know about are, in fact, real." In other words, it's useful for "proving" one's objectivity.

However, it is hard to see how someone who doesn't really care about whom to blame for something can believe that there is a conspiracy about that thing. This curiosity needs some explanation. (ETA: I see you have already spoken about this, bluegray V.)

Human beings are very, very adept at inventing after-the-fact "explanations" for just about anything that happens to or around them. Also, one will always find individuals who turn their passions, good or bad, into their livelihood. It's merely a case of taking those passions a few steps further than most other people. David Icke is one such individual, but possibly not the best example - Pat Robertson may well hold that dubious distinction.

'Luthon64

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