South Africa Flag logo

South African Skeptics

November 15, 2019, 20:23:55 PM
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
Go to mobile page.
News: Follow saskeptics on twitter.
   
   Skeptic Forum Board Index   Help Forum Rules Search GoogleTagged Login Register Chat Blogroll  
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic:

Photosynthesis Protein Synthesised

 (Read 5727 times)
Description: A first step to genetically-engineered plants that consume CO2 more efficiently?
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Hermes
Hero Member
*****

Skeptical ability: +18/-2
Offline Offline

Posts: 1137



« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2010, 18:34:09 PM »

So, now we all know how those German scientists assembled Rubisco and what pivotal role it plays in photosynthesis.
Logged
Mefiante
Defollyant Iconoclast
Hero Member
*****

Skeptical ability: +61/-9
Offline Offline

Posts: 3755


In solidarity with rwenzori: Κοπρος φανεται


WWW
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2010, 19:46:03 PM »

Here’s something that photosynthesises.  It doesn’t tell lies and it has an attention span, albeit a very short one.


No, let’s not.

'Luthon64
Logged
Irreverend
Full Member
***

Skeptical ability: +9/-1
Offline Offline

Posts: 222



« Reply #17 on: January 24, 2010, 00:39:57 AM »

Appealing to authority is not exactly an argument.
Mecchie me dull lad, every argument is an appeal to authority. It's just a question of which authority.

Want to have a pissing contest or discuss the validity of EM?
With your weak bladder you'll lose either way. I'll put bucks on it.

Yeeesss, kinda hypocritical to write that if you ask others to define "to exist".
So sez Mr Supremo Slick, Esq.

Define matter and energy in the physicist’s sense. While you are at it, define "to exist" for us before poor Irreverend thinks "your whole argument is up a creek without a paddle". I mean the guy is known for his consistency not?
Matter and energy. China, you really suck at this Google thing. Be a cool dear and define, quote, what it means for something "to exist" with particular reference to sensations in general. Go on, stun me by noticing and respecting the "with particular reference to sensations in general".

Gee, perhaps you should start a thread for questions you want answered.
Gee, perhaps you should start a thread with answers to all the questions that have been asked of you. Wait, you'll need an internet all of your own for that.
Logged
Teleological
Moderate Realist
Hero Member
*****

Skeptical ability: +2/-28
Offline Offline

Posts: 980

Ex Nihilo Nihil Fit


« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2010, 20:55:29 PM »

Appealing to authority is not exactly an argument.
Mecchie me dull lad, every argument is an appeal to authority. It's just a question of which authority.

Really, every argument? Wow man, did you come up with all by yourself and want us all to believe it? Try a bit harder.

Define matter and energy in the physicist’s sense. While you are at it, define "to exist" for us before poor Irreverend thinks "your whole argument is up a creek without a paddle". I mean the guy is known for his consistency not?
Matter and energy. China, you really suck at this Google thing. Be a cool dear and define, quote, what it means for something "to exist" with particular reference to sensations in general. Go on, stun me by noticing and respecting the "with particular reference to sensations in general".

Now that you have found the wiki links (pretty deep stuff that must be for you huh) for matter and energy, what can you tell us about it? You can do more than google can't you? Which version of matter do you prefer btw? Common, revised (whatever that is), general, Aristotelian etc? You read it haven't you? Now where is Mefi with her philosophical materialism and her definitions of matter and energy she prefers and what properties she thinks it has?

« Last Edit: January 24, 2010, 21:56:29 PM by Mechanist. » Logged
Irreverend
Full Member
***

Skeptical ability: +9/-1
Offline Offline

Posts: 222



« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2010, 08:52:52 AM »

Really, every argument?
Yup, but asking you to think about it is a waste of words.

Which version of matter do you prefer btw?
Not the super-dense kind like inside your head.
Logged
Teleological
Moderate Realist
Hero Member
*****

Skeptical ability: +2/-28
Offline Offline

Posts: 980

Ex Nihilo Nihil Fit


« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2010, 09:40:20 AM »

Which version of matter do you prefer btw?
Not the super-dense kind like inside your head.
Sooo, this is your attempt at an answer? You really shouldn't complain about others that are dodging questions you know.

Which version of matter do you prefer then (waiting for a positive and constructive answer ... Wink )?
Logged
Teleological
Moderate Realist
Hero Member
*****

Skeptical ability: +2/-28
Offline Offline

Posts: 980

Ex Nihilo Nihil Fit


« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2010, 15:44:52 PM »

More about proteins folding other proteins into the correct shape and function:
Chaperonins Prompt Proper Protein Folding -- But How?

Quote
ScienceDaily (Jan. 25, 2010) — In proper society of yesterday, a chaperone ensured that couples maintained appropriate courting rituals. In biology, a group of proteins called chaperonins make sure that proteins are folded properly to carry out their assigned roles in the cells.


Quote
In a new study in archaea (single-celled organisms without nuclei to enclose their genetic information), a consortium of researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Stanford University in California discovered how the Group II chaperonins close and open folding chambers to initate the folding event and to release the functional protein to the cell. A report of their work appears in the current issue of the journal Nature.

Archaea is one of three major divisions in the classification of living organisms. The other two are bacteria and eukaryotes. Archaea lack a nucleus but have other characteristics that are similar to those of eukaryotes, which include human beings.

"The important thing about the chaperonin molecule is that it is key to folding proteins in the cell -- proteins such as actin, tubulin and tumor suppressors," said Dr. Wah Chiu, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at BCM and a senior author of the report.

"Previously, people had studied chaperonins in the bacteria Escherichia coli," said Chiu, also director of the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging and of the Nanomedicine Development Center at BCM. "We wanted to look at how chaperonins operated in a new class of organisms, and we chose the archaea."

It turned out that the archaea have a different type of chaperonin dubbed Group II. The structure of this kind of chaperonin is more similar to that of mammals. In essence, both types of chaperonin act as molecular machines, assisting proper protein within the cell. To the surprise of Chiu and his colleagues, the Group II chaperonin worked differently from Group I chaperonins previously studied in E. coli.

"It turns out that this chaperonin -- that we call a molecular nanomachine -- requires ATP (adenosine triphosphate or the major energy currency in cells) to close its chamber," he said.

The group II chaperonins that oversee proper protein folding in this organism have an upper and lower chamber and a built-in lid. ATP adds water to the chaperonin at a critical point. When the water is added, a process called hydrolysis takes place. Without ATP, the chamber is open. When ATP is added, the chamber closes.

"The take home message in this is how the chaperonin opens and closes," said Chiu. The way in which these chaperonins complete a large mechanical motion critical for completing a protein-folding event is different from that of others that have been studied.

Equally important is the tool he and his Stanford colleagues developed to see the complicated structure and dynamic motion of the chaperonin. Combining cryo-electronmicroscopy with intricate computer modeling, they were able to "see" the closed conformation of the single chaperonin particle at a resolution of 4.3 angstroms. (An angstrom is one hundred-millionth of a centimeter. A sheet of paper is approximately 1 million angstroms thick.) The model of the open conformation was resolved down to 8 angstroms.

The models of the open and closed structures reveal how changes in their structure triggered by ATP alter the contacts within the adjacent protein molecules within and across the two chambers, causing a rocking motion that closes the lid of the two chambers of the chaperonin.

"The technique is important in allowing us to see how this nanomachine works," said Chiu. He anticipates that future work with chaperonins in other organisms will reveal even more important structural details.

Others who took part in this work include Junjie Zhang, Matthew L. Baker, Matthew Dougherty, Caroline J. Fu, Joanita Jakana and Dr. Steven J. Ludtke, all of BCM, and Dr. Gunnar F. Schröder, Nicholai R. Douglas, Dr. Stefanie Dr. Reissmann, Dr. Michael Levitt, and Dr. Judith Frydman, all of Stanford University. Zhang was a graduate student in the Program of Structural and Computational Biology and Molecular Biopysics at BCM.

Funding for this work came from the National Institutes of Health Nanomedicine Development Center Roadmap Initiative, the Biomedical Technology Research Center for Structural Biology in the National Center for Research Resources, a Nanobiology Training Fellowship administered by the Keck Center of the Gulf Coast Consortia and the National Science Foundation.


Protein folding machines in all the domains of life... and now we are using it to design our own proteins (see OP).
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 09:10:55 AM by Teleological » Logged
rwenzori
Sniper
Sr. Member
****

Skeptical ability: +7/-1
Offline Offline

Posts: 403


Merda accidit.


« Reply #22 on: January 25, 2010, 18:35:07 PM »

Protein folding machines in all the domains of life... and now we are using it to design our own proteins (see OP).

Oh wow! Ain't Bebeh Jebus so CLEVER!!!
Logged
Irreverend
Full Member
***

Skeptical ability: +9/-1
Offline Offline

Posts: 222



« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2010, 22:14:32 PM »

Which version of matter do you prefer then (waiting for a positive and constructive answer ... Wink )?
Wait on, MacTellyMecchie. I told you already. If you don't like my answer, that's your, um, cross to bear.

Oh wow! Ain't Bebeh Jebus so CLEVER!!!
Not so CLEVER if he can make a TellyMecchie, should you ask me...
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  


 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 1.513 seconds with 24 sceptic queries.
Google visited last this page April 11, 2019, 08:46:58 AM
Privacy Policy