A good quote.....

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brianvds (November 28, 2013, 16:17:29 PM):
'cept for the whole celebacy schpiel, and sitting around chanting with bells, Buddhism is one of the more reasonable "religions". Even though I don't really view it as a religion, but others do.

One can indeed argue that it isn't really a religion. What's more, a lot of the stuff we now associate with Buddhism is baggage it has picked up over the centuries, that has little to do with anything Gautama Siddhartha originally said. Even today, you don't have to be celibate or chant in order to be a Buddhist; that is just for monks. :-)
brianvds (November 28, 2013, 16:50:23 PM):
Speaking of quotes, go try out the Random Deepak Chopra Quote Generator:

http://www.wisdomofchopra.com/

That's, er, Deep, man.
Mefiante (November 28, 2013, 17:30:32 PM):
Buddhism is a religion to the extent that it involves worship, ritual and faith in mystical notions, all of which are defining characteristics of a religion. Where it differs is that it holds a theological noncognitivist/ignostic view of any and all supreme deities.

Perhaps the most significant distinguishing attribute of Buddhism, one that sets it apart from all other mainstream religions, is that it abides being side-by-side with other religions and belief system, which means that the Buddhist canon allows you to be a Christian and a Buddhist simultaneously. All other mainstream religions have strict rules condemning such accommodationism as heresy.

At least that’s the theory; in practice, we have the glaring counterexample of Myanmar (formerly Burma) where Buddhists and Muslims are regularly at one another’s throats, and it’s often the Buddhists who cast the proverbial first stone. Also, while Buddhism holds all life to be sacred, this doesn’t prevent Tibetan monks from committing atrocities on beggars who are caught stealing food from their monasteries. One such act is breaking the bones of culprits and leaving them overnight outside to the snow and ice where they freeze to death. The monks rationalise such actions away as the person’s karma debits catching up with them, rather than them having killed the person directly. (I can’t remember in which book I read about this; it may have been Heinrich Harrer’s Seven Years in Tibet.)

'Luthon64
brianvds (November 28, 2013, 19:35:47 PM):
At least that’s the theory; in practice, we have the glaring counterexample of Myanmar (formerly Burma) where Buddhists and Muslims are regularly at one another’s throats, and it’s often the Buddhists who cast the proverbial first stone. Also, while Buddhism holds all life to be sacred, this doesn’t prevent Tibetan monks from committing atrocities on beggars who are caught stealing food from their monasteries. One such act is breaking the bones of culprits and leaving them overnight outside to the snow and ice where they freeze to death. The monks rationalise such actions away as the person’s karma debits catching up with them, rather than them having killed the person directly


One has to wonder if the Buddha himself would have approved of such things (in the same way that one has to wonder whether Jesus did not spend much of his three days in the underworld turning in his grave at the thought of what would be perpetrated in his name).

But that's the problem with all religions and philosophies when they become large enough to become organized: established bureaucratic power structures and privileges begin to speak louder than the original philosophies. Just about every Utopian idea ever conceived, no matter how benign initially, sooner or later fell into this trap. It's a mistake humans have been making over and over and over, and there is no end in sight.
cr1t (November 29, 2013, 11:26:08 AM):
I think a lot off good ideas can be pulled from Buddhism including other religions but most of it is bunk.

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