Christianity

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Wandapec (September 30, 2009, 07:39:41 AM):
My question remains: whether or not a person believes in whichever god or no god at all - why does it matter?

Because belief effects behaviour. If you believe the creator of the universe is watching you all the time and He either approves of disapproves of what you do, you are bound to act differently. Equally importantly, people who say they know what God wants you to do are more likely to have an effect. Our society could do without this kind of credulity.
I agree. Just as an example, if we could, ask the people that died in the buildings and planes on 9/11 whether they think it matters or not?
Why do you assume that there should be a point at all?
This is an excellent point! ;)
My faith is built upon my personal relationship with my Maker.
I also have a great relationship with my mom and faith doesn't even come into the picture.
until I have investigated through study of God's word before deciding whether it is worth taking note of or not.
'Luthon64 and Jane's points are valid - I would be interested to know how you decided which god to investigate and study and what was the evidence for that? Or maybe explain how you excluded all the others?
Lilli (September 30, 2009, 15:08:33 PM):
You say that belief affects behaviour. I will not at this time argue with you about that, but merely remind you that many things can affect a persons behaviour - not least of which is choice. People don't do what we do because we believe in fairness and goodness unless we conciously make the choice to be fair, or do good - because it will eventually benefit us as well. There is no such thing as a completely selfless act, and I dont think anybody really believes that the god they believe in needs THEM to survive.

Oh and I dont think the people who died in 9/11 really apply to this line of thought, they are dead... to quote from earlier in this conversation: "The dead have no input on the subject of morality. Because they're dead. Hence morality necessarily serves the living." (really like that, thanks)
Wandapec (September 30, 2009, 15:59:52 PM):
Oh and I dont think the people who died in 9/11 really apply to this line of thought, they are dead... to quote from earlier in this conversation: "The dead have no input on the subject of morality. Because they're dead. Hence morality necessarily serves the living." (really like that, thanks)
My point was that these fellows behaved the way they did because the houri's were just too tempting. ;) The alternative, to my missed point, would be to ask the loved ones of the people that died, whether or not it matters. Understandably, time will heal a lot of wounds but given a choice I think that many of the children etc. would have loved to have grown up with and got to know their mom's or dad's.

So the dead may not have any input on the subject of morality once they are dead, but their actions while they were living do tell you something, don't they?
Peter Grant (September 30, 2009, 19:45:49 PM):
You say that belief affects behaviour. I will not at this time argue with you about that, but merely remind you that many things can affect a persons behaviour - not least of which is choice.

Please define your use of the word choice. The kind I'm familiar with is based on beliefs one holds about reality. Without these beliefs one would hardly be choosing, more like guessing.

People don't do what we do because we believe in fairness and goodness unless we conciously make the choice to be fair, or do good - because it will eventually benefit us as well.

I don't really think so, I find myself being nice just because I find it enjoyable and often easier.

There is no such thing as a completely selfless act,

Why do you say this? I can think if many examples of heroic acts people have performed at great risk to themselves.

and I dont think anybody really believes that the god they believe in needs THEM to survive.

No, but they don't really believe they can be killed either, just tortured or rewarded eternally.
Irreverend (September 30, 2009, 21:19:50 PM):
My question remains: whether or not a person believes in whichever god or no god at all - why does it matter?
Do you think people are happy believing anything as long as it keeps them happy? If you tell someone their beliefs are dodgy, they'll jump up to defend them as being true. What they won't do is say "Well, this belief makes me feel good". So most people have a basic understanding that truth is very important for its own sake. That's one good reason why it matters.

Another one is summed up in the words of Voltaire: "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities". Sociopaths and psychopaths are not the human norm. That's another good reason that it matters. Who wants to be an unthinking slave to belief?

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