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Fact or Fable? Multitasking

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Mefiante
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In solidarity with rwenzori: Κοπρος φανεται


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« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2016, 13:05:14 PM »

The trick is hype and obfuscation.  I’ll put good money on it that the hidden “central pendulum” draws from an external power source to keep the whole contrivance going.  Why do I say this?  First, because it’s hidden and there’s no sound reason why that should be so.  In fact, the brass upright and casing at the base would only decouple the central pendulum from the external magnets that supposedly keep it oscillating.  Second, because when you watch the device in operation, there are lots of things happening at the same time, several of which entail energy losses, such as the rolling friction of the ball on the circular rail, friction in the pendulum pivots, heat and collision losses after the ball triggers each of the three actuators, air friction on moving parts, magnetic hysteresis, etc.

I’m not in the least worried that this guy has found a way around the laws of thermodynamics.  And, contrary to what the video’s narrator asserts, I highly doubt he’s a mathematician in any meaningful sense of that word.

'Luthon64
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brianvds
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« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2016, 14:28:56 PM »


I’m not in the least worried that this guy has found a way around the laws of thermodynamics.  And, contrary to what the video’s narrator asserts, I highly doubt he’s a mathematician in any meaningful sense of that word.



Easy enough to make wild claims of qualifications; people do it all the time. Years ago I ran into "Dr" Douglas Forbes, inventor of the Human PIN Code. I see there was even a thread about it here:

http://forum.skeptic.za.org/general-skepticism/human-pin-code/

He got his, er, Ph.D. from a diploma mill and couldn't refer me to his doctoral thesis. I even wrote to the diploma mill in question, only to be told that they don't just give out copies of students' theses.

He made all manner of wild claims, such as that he held a patent on a mini black hole for garbage disposal and that he "solved Pythagoras' Octagon Theory" (whatever the freck that is). And people fell for it hook, line and sinker. For a while there he was something of a minor celebrity.

I learned about him from an excited friend who is a very decent person, but jeez, she's as gullible as they come. She even did all his expensive courses to become a PIN Code practitioner herself. Eventually switched to face reading, of which she is now a hugely successful practitioner, and indeed she has achieved significantly more celebrity status than "Dr." Forbes could dream of.
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #32 on: November 28, 2016, 08:19:40 AM »

If you want your children to thrive: Teach them how to lie with a straight face and eschew pesky morality stuff. It's too late for me.

Recently someone giddily pointed out to me that their "Vape" only releases "2 or 3 chemicals", unlike cigarettes with their "thousands", and are thus safe. Pontificating on whether pure Arsenic is as dangerous as the thousands of chemicals in a Banana .... but we never got that far.
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