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Matric

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Tweefo
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« on: January 06, 2011, 14:09:46 PM »

I see that the 2010 Gr 12 results are out with an improvement over previous years. Is that because of a genuine improvement, a more relaxed exam or a not so stringent marking of the papers? In 2010 there was the World cup and strike so pupils lost a lot of work days. I am somewhat sceptical about this.
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Lilli
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Lelani Stolp
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2011, 14:25:45 PM »

I wrote (and passed) Matric in 2003. A good friend of mine's daughter wrote (and also passed) in 2009. I saw some of her exam papers, and tutored her in Math prior to the exams. My opinion at that stage was that the curriculum had certainly changed, but not that it had become any easier. I would like to compare some of the latest exam papers. Of course, Matric was pretty damn easy in 2003 too - my final English (Second Language, unfortunately) paper actually posted the question: "you wear a necklace around your neck. Where do you wear a bracelet?"
Yep, they gave us 2 marks if we got that one one right...
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Rigil Kent
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« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2011, 14:58:06 PM »

I wrote (and passed) Matric in 2003.
Yup, I remember it bein' purty hard back then...   Cry

Mintaka
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st0nes
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« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2011, 15:13:19 PM »

Gee, I dunno.  I wrote in 1976 and my son wrote this year (IEB).  His syllabus is harder than mine was, I think.  For example, we didn't do calculus even for higher grade, but they do it now.
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Rigil Kent
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« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2011, 15:16:36 PM »

... we didn't do calculus

Why the username then - irony Wink?

Mintaka
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st0nes
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« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2011, 15:18:32 PM »

... we didn't do calculus

Why the username then - irony Wink?

Mintaka
Ha!  did it later at 'varsity..
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Faerie
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« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2011, 15:31:58 PM »

My son's in matric this year, and I'm dreading it.  I dont make heads or tails of his work (admittedly I didnt do the same subjects), I'm of an opinion that its on par with what we did back in the 80's. What is not on par is the level of teaching taking place, he's been taking extra classes for Maths, science and accounting since Grade 10, and whilst his marks are fair, its far from achieving a distinction.  He's in a good school which has managed a fairly consistent 100% pass rate for the last couple years (dunno about 2010 though).
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StevoMuso
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« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2011, 00:03:50 AM »

Gee, I dunno.  I wrote in 1976 and my son wrote this year (IEB).  His syllabus is harder than mine was, I think.  For example, we didn't do calculus even for higher grade, but they do it now.
Hey st0nes, I also did matric in '76 - Pretoria Boy's High. But excuse my ignorance, how is your username linked to calculus?
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st0nes
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« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2011, 06:53:26 AM »

Gee, I dunno.  I wrote in 1976 and my son wrote this year (IEB).  His syllabus is harder than mine was, I think.  For example, we didn't do calculus even for higher grade, but they do it now.
Hey st0nes, I also did matric in '76 - Pretoria Boy's High. But excuse my ignorance, how is your username linked to calculus?
Quote from: Oxford Concise dictionary
   /ˈkalkjʊləs/
noun

      1 (plural calculuses)(also infinitesimal calculus)[mass noun] the branch of mathematics that deals with the finding and properties of derivatives and integrals of functions, by methods originally based on the summation of infinitesimal differences. The two main types are differential calculus and integral calculus.
But also
Quote from: Oxford Concise Dictionary
      3 (plural calculi /-lʌɪ, -liː/)Medicinea hard mass formed by minerals within the body, especially in the kidney or gall bladder.
My nickname is after the Rolling Stones, who may or may not be named after kidney stones.
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Lilli
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Lelani Stolp
« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2011, 07:24:03 AM »

I wrote (and passed) Matric in 2003.
Yup, I remember it bein' purty hard back then...   Cry 
Was it? Dunno, I thought most of it was pretty straight forward. Say what you want about how tough it was in the '80s or whenever, people still have to pass matric if they want to get into a university, get a degree and get a job other than flipping burgers (not that I have anything against people flipping burgers, they play a very important role in society) My matric was good enough to get me accepted into a bridging programme at the conservatory of Amsterdam (which I would have had to do even if I was in school in the Netherlands by the way) and a kid getting my grades with my subjects today would most likely also be accepted. So I'm not saying that the standards have/have not dropped, I'm saying its a pretty tough one to prove since none of us who wrote matric at any time in the past are likely to do it again now. 
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Tweefo
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« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2011, 08:41:55 AM »

Quote
I also did matric in '76 - Pretoria Boy's High
I am also a '76 boy. Morgenzon Landbou Skool.
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Benjammin
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« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2011, 12:07:07 PM »

The other issue: passed with what subjects at what level? How many of those 67% are going to gain University entrance?

On another note, there is a wonderful TED talk, on the strange never questioned way in which we educate. Why we value certain subjects over others. http://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_says_schools_kill_creativity.html
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rwenzori
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« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2011, 16:32:59 PM »


My nickname is after the Rolling Stones, who may or may not be named after kidney stones.

Thanks for clarifying. I always thought the Stones were named from a song, and so it seems to be - by Muddy Waters, and it has these classic lyrics:

Quote
Well, I wish I was a catfish,
swimmin in a oh, deep, blue sea
I would have all you good lookin women,
fishin, fishin after me

Which, apropos of nuffing, brings us the song Catfish John, which the Dead recorded, IIRC.

There must be something to these catfish thingies.
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rwenzori
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« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2011, 16:45:23 PM »

Ha!  did it later at 'varsity..

I did it in matric Additional Maths, which allowed me to do Maths I at varsity and pass without sitting through the endless long 3-hour tuts.  Smiley

Lazily, I gave up on Mafs and went off artsy-fartsy after that.

My daughter though had Differentiation as part of her ( Cambridge ) matric maths, so the standard syllabus does seem to be more advanced than in my day ( which was so long ago the hypotenuse was just being invented ).
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Mefiante
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« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2011, 17:15:45 PM »

I always thought the Stones were named from a song, and so it seems to be - by Muddy Waters…
[derail]
Yes, that’s my understanding also, though it may be urban musical legend.  Muddy Waters (“he invented electricity”) did release an album titled Mississippi Rollin’ Stone (though he came from Chicago) in the 50s and, according to the story, that is where Mick Jagger and his crew took their name.
[/derail]

'Luthon64
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Hermes
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« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2011, 20:58:08 PM »

I thought St Ones was a boastful referece to academic achievement.
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StevoMuso
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« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2011, 02:45:09 AM »

Quote
I also did matric in '76 - Pretoria Boy's High
I am also a '76 boy. Morgenzon Landbou Skool.
Yay! Class of '76 produced 3 of us! CoooWELL!
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Rigil Kent
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« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2011, 07:44:52 AM »

I thought St Ones was a boastful referece to academic achievement.


 Grin Grin Grin

On the topic of subject choice:
http://www.rapport.co.za/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Matriek-sonder-wiskunde-20110107-3
M.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2011, 08:01:49 AM by Mintaka » Logged
alloytoo
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« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2011, 14:06:25 PM »

I see that the 2010 Gr 12 results are out with an improvement over previous years. Is that because of a genuine improvement, a more relaxed exam or a not so stringent marking of the papers? In 2010 there was the World cup and strike so pupils lost a lot of work days. I am somewhat sceptical about this.

Given that those that passed represent 28% of the children that originally entered the education system, I see very little to be pleased with. The education system has failed almost a million children.

Over course 28% might well be considered a pass mark nowadays.
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2011, 11:04:59 AM »

I finished matric in '98, afaik this was one of the last years to not be on the "new and improved" OBE syllabus, at that point HG maths at a national level included quite a bit of differentiation over a substantial part of the matric year. IIRC logarithms were the first thing we did day 1 of matric, followed by differentiation, limits, and then moving onto the usual trig/geometry stuff. At the very, very end we were introduced to integration. Just basic stuff, nothing like 1st year calculus.

I also recall us walking out of our trig/geometry final ready to commit suicide. It was one of those "controversial" papers that just seemed unreasonable from the first question, robbed me of my distinction ... and sunk quite a number of students. I recall being over the moon with the algebra paper, but that trig paper made me think I'd just lost my varsity entry. Luckily when I walked out this seemed like the all-round consensus, and it seems the varsity was fine with that mark.

I'm actually shocked to see that these days for a varsity exemption all you require is a 40% mark. Wow.
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Mefiante
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« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2011, 14:22:20 PM »

At last:  A reader shows how SA can achieve a 100% matric pass rate in just a few short years.  In Afrikaans, nogal. Wink

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cyghost
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« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2011, 14:50:20 PM »

 Grin
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Mefiante
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« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2011, 16:15:00 PM »

For those who struggled with matric Afrikaans (i.e. those who saw too much of their Afrikaans teachers):
Quote
According to my normally undiscerning calculations, the average grade 12 pupil (oh, I mean learner) has over the past year had 20,25 workdays less class contact with her teachers.

This has, as per confirmed reports, led to an astonishing rise in the national pass rate from 60,6% to 67,8%, or in fact about 7 percentage points.

How are we to interpret this miracle?  Does this mean teachers are an obstacle to our learners’ education, or does it simply mean too much of a good thing is bad?

Be that as it may, it is potentially an international breakthrough in pedagogy.  I know this theory is counterintuitive, but many a scientific advance has been made through lucky coincidence.

What now remains for our Department of Basic Education to do, I’d like to propose, is to test the “hypothesis of the semi-useless teacher” this year by asking SADTU to extend lost class time with learners by a further 20 days to a full 40 workdays.

If my theory holds up, the national pass rate will increase by a further 7 percentage points to a robust 75%.  If the experiment yields success this year, we can raise the number of lost contact days in 2012 from 40 to 60, and so on.

It is perhaps even possible – provided my theory holds up – that in this manner we can within five years surpass the magical 100% pass rate.  Indeed, we can achieve this target even sooner, because remember that in three years’ time matriculants will have already had four years of reduced teacher contact, not just one year.  Needless to say, a pass rate of over 100% is a noble goal and will hold many advantages for our country.

ERWIN RODE

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« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2011, 12:10:54 PM »

Turns out it has been discovered why there were such badly performing schools. Witchcraft nogal. Roll Eyes WTF!!

http://www.timeslive.co.za/local/article851368.ece/Badly-performing-schools-blame-witchcraft
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StevoMuso
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« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2011, 09:16:33 AM »

Turns out it has been discovered why there were such badly performing schools. Witchcraft nogal. Roll Eyes WTF!!

http://www.timeslive.co.za/local/article851368.ece/Badly-performing-schools-blame-witchcraft

Un-friggen-believable!
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Brian
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« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2011, 11:59:21 AM »

Not-so-unbelievable Stevo. When people have been indoctrinated from birth in to mysticism, religion, magic and such BS, combined with an external-locus-of-control mentality, they:
  • do not accept responsibility for their own failures
  • apportion blame to whichever deity, spirit etc that is fashionable and/or instills sufficient fear to get them off the hook
In addition, I have seen on our farm that a woman who suffers from epilepsy, and has a seizure is seen to be possessed by demons and would opt for treatment by a witchdoctor instead of seeking medical attention. To add to this, when this happens they seem to believe that they are 'special' and then cut out for training as a sangoma! WTF!!..and so the myth is perpetuated.
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« Reply #26 on: January 17, 2011, 14:54:21 PM »

This development gives us a clear indication of the quality of person that can be a school principal.   I would not be entirely surprised if they retain their positions - believing in witches can be regarded as religion, not so?   Those schools sound like zoos.
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Lilli
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Lelani Stolp
« Reply #27 on: January 17, 2011, 15:01:33 PM »

I would not be entirely surprised if they retain their positions - believing in witches can be regarded as religion, not so?
Which is exactly why religion, in my opinion, should be kept out of schools entirely. Nobody should care if you failed an exam because an evil spirit made you stupid or because you were too lazy to study, or too stupid to pass the test to begin with. Sure, if the level of teaching was not up to scratch, then the powers that be can try do something about it, but playing a blame-game never really gets anyone anywhere. (much like religious ideas in general  Tongue ) And while we're (almost) on the topic of religion in schools, students should not be wasting time in those religious assembly thingies on Monday mornings. seriously. wft? The whole educational approach seems to me to be based on religious indoctrination a whole lot more than what it should be, or claims to be.
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