Recommended reading

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BoogieMonster (January 26, 2016, 12:11:40 PM):
Alas I don't read much in the traditional sense... maybe a book a year if I get around to it. My reading is more sporadic and internet based, or I read a couple of chapters of a book to get a feel and then realise I'm not so into it... For example:

I've recently read some stuff by Malcolm Gladwell mostly because he's been blowing up in the younger's zeitgeist. I've had him quoted at me multiple times at social events subsequently, or bits from his books repeated verbatim: I have thus prepared to blow some skepticism at the quoters. Fun is to be had when you know people's sources ahead of time.

Gladwell is actually an excellent storyteller and can hold your interest with deft technique.. he's an able conveyor of interesting and thought-provoking tidbits. What I do find though is the "science" seems less present. He's more into unique and contrary ideas but the facts could be up to interpretation, but are mostly hugely anecdotal.

So I recommend that he's read but with a skeptical outlook.

For pure fiction, SciFi is the only thing that can hold my attention and in that genre my favourite novel(s) by far is "Pandora's Star" and it's follow-up "Judas Unchained" by Peter Hamilton. I've recommended these before to various people (prob. here too) and always get glowing reviews back. But it is meant for longer attention spans... the whole story spans something like 2000 pages. It takes a long time to get going but by the end of the 1st novel you're left breathless and in awe of this writer (from multiple friends' reviews).
st0nes (January 26, 2016, 13:00:57 PM):
If you want to catch up on some classics that you have missed, you could download them free from Project Gutenberg. They've got some really good stuff there, for instance W. Somerset Maugham's books have fallen out of copyright, and are in the public domain. I've got my e-reader packed with enough to keep me going for years, and all free as the air.
Hermes (January 26, 2016, 14:46:25 PM):
Unfortunately Project Gutenberg Americanizes the text. I find it awkward reading a Dickens in which the navy has been replaced with the marines.
st0nes (January 26, 2016, 14:50:49 PM):
Unfortunately Project Gutenberg Americanizes the text. I find it awkward reading a Dickens in which the navy has been replaced with the marines.
I do proofreading for PG, and we're very careful to match the original text. We certainly don't 'Americanize' anything. To which Dickens do you refer?
Hermes (January 26, 2016, 15:00:30 PM):
To which Dickens do you refer?
David Copperfield. I'm fairly sure at some places an extra floor was added to buildings as well, but I do not have a printed copy to check that.

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