Ritual

(1/11) > >>

Rigil Kent (October 10, 2014, 10:02:13 AM):
Rituals are practiced by the faithful all over. This suggests that it may be required to reinforce faith.

We are reminded by the church that in communist Russia, where religious ritual was banned for a while, Christianity still famously survived. But it is quite possible that ritual simply went underground, rather than ceased.

What do you think ...

Are we inherently rational?
Is ritual the little Dutch boy's finger in the dyke of irrationality?

Rigil
Tweefo (October 10, 2014, 10:49:22 AM):
Slightly off topic, sorry.
I saw this somewhere the other day: "What would be the Atheist ritual food for special occasions?". The answers range from "strictly organic and GMO free" to a few rather silly suggestions. But should an atheist food by definition not be "nothing special"? We don't have special occasions, do we? Maybe Douglas Adams "Towel day" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Towel_Daybut can't think of anything else.
cr1t (October 10, 2014, 11:40:56 AM):
Slightly off topic, sorry.
I saw this somewhere the other day: "What would be the Atheist ritual food for special occasions?". The answers range from "strictly organic and GMO free" to a few rather silly suggestions. But should an atheist food by definition not be "nothing special"? We don't have special occasions, do we? Maybe Douglas Adams "Towel day" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Towel_Daybut can't think of anything else.


Everyday is an atheist holiday.
So what ever you eat today will be the ritual food, I just ate a babotie pie
brianvds (October 10, 2014, 12:09:03 PM):
Actually, just about everybody participates in rituals of some sort. The commies in the USSR had their own rituals. And when grandma dies, no matter how staunch an atheist you may be, you don't just throw her in the recycle bin.

Humans seem to have a need for ritual. One has to wonder why.
Mefiante (October 10, 2014, 12:34:25 PM):
I’d guess our need for ritual is entirely psychological. We find comfort and security in things with which we are familiar. Ritual, by its nature, is either practising and reaffirming that which is familiar, or a formal path towards becoming familiar with something. We are (mostly) creatures of habit, and ritual is just embellished habit. Also, we are distressed, often disproportionately, when we find our habits are under threat, whether real or imaginary.

I am reminded of a short SF story (Asimov or Bradbury, IIRC) in which a Japanese Hiroshima (or Nagasaki) survivor is transported a few hundred years into the future shortly after the A-bomb attack by would-be scientific Samaritans from that future. The short of it is that he is so unfamiliar with and bewildered by that ostensibly much better world in which peace and comfort and magical technology prevail that he begs to be put back into his own time, despite all the ruination and death reigning there. I think that story marks a dramatic take on the human condition — one that is nonetheless perceptively accurate.

'Luthon64

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Skeptic Forum Board Index

Non-mobile version of page