South African government and national sceptical ability

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Rigil Kent (June 26, 2009, 09:28:25 AM):
Our constitution now guarantees freedoms unheard of in the recent past, and leaves more decisions up to the individual. But is there anything that the government can gain from nurturing a sceptical public, and is it therefore likely to promote critical thinking amongst South-Africans?

I think yes. By teaching critical thinking, people are likely to make more informed and logical decisions which will surely stimulate the economy. The government will benefit from a stimulated economy, and will be perceived as progressive, and get voted for again.

Mintaka
Owen Swart (June 26, 2009, 10:39:43 AM):
At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist, I think there's a considerable risk for an ANC-led government to promote critical thinking and scepticism. The last thing they want is their supporters questioning their promises and decrees. That's the sort of thing that loses elections before "Jesus returns".
Barryl (June 26, 2009, 11:30:18 AM):
Quote
But is there anything that the government can gain from nurturing a sceptical public, and is it therefore likely to promote critical thinking amongst South-Africans?


In my opinion there are two sides to this motion.

1. If you foster and promote critical thinking amongst the citizens of a country it will eventually lead to a more advanced society with resultant economic and
other benefits. Hopefully also a society with good moral and ethical values.

2. On the counter side power-hungry governments will not be inclined to relinquish their power. And if they come to realize that a society may become
autonomous in their thinking by becoming critical thinkers, they may just change their mind about promoting such thinking.

But I get the feeling that the government has come to realize that they should not cook the proverbial goose, rather nurture him and in that way we all score.


Critical and Creative thinking should, I think, be introduced as a school subject in South Africa. The great guru on this subject is Dr Edward de Bono.
He has been promoting the idea of "thinking clubs/groups" where a small number of people gather to practice and acquire the skill of thinking (not debate). He has been instrumental to having "thinking" introduced as a school subject in Venezuela and (I forget) some other countries. He is also being contracted by Australian cricket.

Metaphorically speaking, just look at the recipes used by highly successful countries.

Refer: Edward de Bono: "De Bono's Thinking Course"
www.edwdebono.com/

Barryl
Tweefo (June 26, 2009, 14:52:55 PM):
Quote
At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist, I think there's a considerable risk for an ANC-led government to promote critical thinking and scepticism. The last thing they want is their supporters questioning their promises and decrees. That's the sort of thing that loses elections before "Jesus returns
Any clear headed voter will not vote for this incompetent bunch so the last thing they want is a nation of sceptics
Mefiante (June 26, 2009, 22:23:04 PM):
As a matter of fact, whether they actually realise it or not, it is in any government’s interests to foster a populace capable of consequent and critical thinking for the simple reason that it is the surest path to all-round prosperity, which in turn makes governing easier because prosperous people demand less interference by and help from their governments. However, seeing the bigger picture is not usually prominent among governments’ abilities.

'Luthon64

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