Taste

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BoogieMonster (June 29, 2015, 15:20:40 PM):
Anyway, years ago I had occasion to experimentally test the difference in wine that has "breathed" versus wine that has not.

Paradoxically, I don't drink that cool-aid, I prefer it un-breathed. IMHO a wine that has "over breathed" for more than 30mins starts to turn too acidic. How much of this is in my head, I dunno.

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We tried it out on his wife, who did not know, and she had no trouble telling the two apart.

Do you know which she preferred?

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There seems to me to be a definite difference in taste between various wines, and some are better than others, but I doubt very much whether this difference is very big, or justifies a huge difference in price.

It depends. Some expensive stuff I find to be nectar of the gods, whilst others make me want to spit it out (and not in the wine-tasting way). On the flip-side there are cheap wines that are really stunning. It is, like so many things in this world, all about branding. "Cheap" wines are often the ones that haven't made a name for themselves yet. Once that happens, you can say bye-bye to the low sticker price. The brands would have you believe this is down to the age of the vine. It plays a role, but it's not everything, I've had "60 year old vine" wine that truly sucked.

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What's more, I often find myself very much liking wines that have been shot down by the learned critics.

It depends on which critics at what juncture. Certain wine awards work by blind tasting, some don't. Also IMHO wine depends way too much on personal taste.

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The same goes for many other things. E.g. I can't remember the details, but apparently in some or other test, even expert violinists and listeners could not tell the difference between the sound of a Stradivarius and a well made modern instrument. For decades, if not centuries, there has been speculation about what exactly Stradivarius' secret was: specially aged wood? The varnish? The exact thickness of the various bits and pieces? But, as with the Bermuda Triangle, they were trying to find a solution to a non-mystery.

Well, to add to the lore for you: I've heard it claimed that he made violins during/after an unusually cold spell in earth's history, which means the trees had tighter-packed rings which means the density of the wood was slightly higher. Hence why it has since been "impossible" to replicate. That's the legend I heard, anyway.

Regarding art: Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
brianvds (June 30, 2015, 06:14:10 AM):
Do you know which she preferred?

The one that had breathed. As do I, though your point that a wine that has hyperventilated gets too acidic may well be valid. The solution is to drink it all before over-breathing can set in. :-)

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It depends. Some expensive stuff I find to be nectar of the gods, whilst others make me want to spit it out (and not in the wine-tasting way)

After a glass or two, the taste hardly matters anymore anyway. :-)

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Well, to add to the lore for you: I've heard it claimed that he made violins during/after an unusually cold spell in earth's history, which means the trees had tighter-packed rings which means the density of the wood was slightly higher. Hence why it has since been "impossible" to replicate. That's the legend I heard, anyway.

Humans seem to have a propensity to believe in a mythical golden age in the past, when everything was better. Me, I think the modern age is much better than the past. Well, that is to say, the modern age up until around when I was twelve;after that we went into a decline. :-)

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Regarding art: Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

That's true enough, though when it comes to "investment art," the prices have zilch to do with whether anyone finds the work beautiful...
Mefiante (July 01, 2015, 16:41:44 PM):
More huffy airs from Planet of the Oenophiles. In vino veritas, indeed.

'Luthon64

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