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Toilets in space

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Tweefo
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« on: January 09, 2009, 10:00:08 AM »

Japanese scientists came up with this design. http://www.universetoday.com/2009/01/08/what-a-relief-new-space-toilet-being-designed/ 1st question: How do you wipe yourself? How much time, effort and money went into this? It would have been easier to design a robot to go and do whatever humans are suppose to be doing up there. They don't need toilets.

How do I insert a Hyperlink with just a word instead of the URL that takes up a whole paragraph?
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Mefiante
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2009, 11:48:51 AM »

How do I insert a Hyperlink with just a word instead of the URL that takes up a whole paragraph?
You can do this using the “URL” tags.  To illustrate the technique, I’ve added the underscore character (“_”) between adjacent characters to prevent it being rendered as an actual link.

For example, "[_u_r_l_=_h_t_t_p_:_/_/_w_w_w_._m_y_s_i_t_e_._c_o_._z_a_/_]my link text[_/_u_r_l_]" will, upon removing all the underscore characters,  appear as "my link text" and link to the chosen URL (which is not currently a valid one).



Regarding the use of robots in space, there are certain classes of problems robots cannot yet effectively address, especially those that arise when things do not go as planned as they invariably do even if the deviations are minor.  The fine motor control, flexibility and delicate abilities of human hands far exceed that of any robot, and the human brain can make far better situation assessments and autonomous proactive and reactive decisions, and humans can, in general, also implement these much more efficiently.

Thus, while robots certainly could be of much assistance (and have been, e.g. the Mars probes), until we manage to construct essentially self-governing, even self-repairing robots, there will still be a need and a place for humans in space exploration.

'Luthon64
« Last Edit: January 09, 2009, 12:06:46 PM by Anacoluthon64, Reason: Mending amendments... » Logged
Rigil Kent
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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2009, 11:56:02 AM »

Neat li'l sucker.

Another spacetech spin-off that can work wonders on earth -  will certainly cut down on your travel time between JHB and CT.

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Tweefo
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2009, 08:47:45 AM »

Thanks for the link info.
I know of only a few missions where humans in space was needed. Most of them to fix and upgrade the Hubble Telescope. Most other space craft can't be serviced, because they were not designed to be. There are no handholds on them. Also in space the gloves you wear are quite thick, so there goes the nimble finger movements.
Hubble could have been a bigger and better telescope but was designed (political pressure) to fit into the Shuttle for delivery into space. Wonderful as Hubble is it would have been cheaper to build a new space telescope than to repair and service it. (Don't know about the political will though)
Apollo 13 needed humans (the Huston we have a problem mission) but the mission was to land on the Moon, pick up some samples and return. They never managed to land and pick up samples so in this case they only return themselves. The Russians returned samples with Luna 16 in 1970, not as sexy as a man on the moon but just as effective.
Humans on the ISS spend by far most of their time doing housework. The experiments they do was all done before.
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Sentinel
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2009, 15:48:09 PM »

Cool, a space nappie!

One day we can fit them on our babies!  It will be "godsent" when they start consuming solids!

I'd much prefer this to an adult nappie one day...
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