BodyTalk & Quantum Quackery

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Sentinel (August 01, 2007, 19:55:25 PM):
The latest episode of Carte Blanche (29 July 2007) reminded me of an experience I had a few years ago. For those who missed the episode, it focused on the Gert Van Rooyen scandal of the late 1980's and 1990's. Danie Krugel, claims to have the ability to track down certain items like humans, diamonds and oil by using a small sample of the object or a DNA sample of the person and introducing it to his GPS/Quantum Wonder Box. It was not made clear exactly how the machine finds a "signal" to the subject. If it really works, I'll be one of the first in line once they begin full scale production! Honestly, I'm disappointed in Carte Blanche, who has lost any respect I might have had for them as a result of their lack of journalistic integrity. I would have resigned if I was one of the leading presenters. ;D

Back to the subject: BodyTalk

I found this on their official website:

Quote
BodyTalk is an astonishingly simple and effective form of therapy that allows the body's energy systems to be re-synchronized so they can operate as nature intended. Each system, cell and atom is in constant communication with each other at all times. Through exposure to the stresses of day-to-day life, however, these lines of communication can become compromised, which then leads to a decline in physical, emotional and/or mental well-being. Reconnecting these lines of communication enables the body's mechanisms to function at optimal levels, thus preventing disease and rapidly accelerating the healing process. In this way, BodyTalk stimulates the body's innate ability to balance and heal itself.

My experience on this subject is due to a period in my life when I was looking for alternatives to popular belief systems and medical practises.

At the BodyTalk specialist's office, one completes a form with questions related to your medical history. You have to remove all your jewellery and shoes and lie down on an examination table. The specialist holds your arm and hand in one hand, and asks your body a number of questions, shifting the free hands (yours and the examiner's) to different parts of your body. Your body then "talks" or responds to the examiner and the examiner in turn gives your body certain instructions to function properly or to correct certain malfunctions. :o

Apparently, the specialist is able to continue the treatment, even if you are on the other side of the world and not physically present. The specialist I spoke to claimed to have done work for a well known conspiracy theorist, living on an island off the coast of the UK and mentioned that she planned on doing a session for him that evening. ???

I would admit that I am neither a medical doctor nor a quantum physicist, but this does not seem to make any sense to me. Are the cells in one's body intelligent? Are they able to follow some sort of protocol and communicate with the brain? If so, can the brain or specialist instruct the cells to repair itself, remotely no less, similar to the "Kruge Wonder Box"? I don't think I would be wrong in guessing that this is quackery. I hope for humanity's sake that I am wrong, but I am not holding my breath

Do these "specialists" really believe in what they are doing? This must be the case, for the alternative would be that they are psychopaths. Nothing less than tarring and feathering would suffice, or maybe the sheep deserve it for being so gullible. Million-Dollar Industry! Baaah!

The warning label should probably stay off this one!

Mefiante (August 02, 2007, 16:29:03 PM):
Is this BodyTalk something that was investigated by Carte Blanche? Because if so, there should be a transcript on their website. Otherwise, do you perhaps have a link to their website?

The quote you have given reads like the quintessential pseudoscience: full of science-y words and prose like "energy systems," "re-synchronized," "optimal levels," "innate ability," etc. One wonders why they left out "quantum" and "vibrations." The sad (and dangerous) part is that many people are so naïve about science that they can't see through this kind of tripe, which is mostly the result of poor schooling and also the broad ignorance of journalists concerning matters of science. Both of these deficiencies are especially rife in South Africa, despite the government's promise many years ago to make Science & Technology literacy a national priority.

'Luthon64
Sentinel (August 03, 2007, 10:10:11 AM):
Thank you for your insightful reply.

Quote
Is this BodyTalk something that was investigated by Carte Blanche? Because if so, there should be a transcript on their website. Otherwise, do you perhaps have a link to their website?


To my knowledge, this subject has not been covered by Carte Blanche.

Their website is http://www.bodytalksystem.com (International) and http://www.bodytalksystem.co.za (South Africa)

I first came across BodyTalk when my fiancee was looking into cancer treatment alternatives for a family member. We were all worried about the fact that she was being so badly affected by chemo. Being both skeptical and open-minded, as I normally am with things I don't know anything about, I investigated the subject right down to subjecting myself to one of these sessions. (In the name of Science!)

I could find no scientific proof that it works, nor could I comprehend how it could actually work. I fully understood what the vast amount of literature and videos claimed, but as far as I am concerned, one would have to believe in the supernatural in order to believe that one person's brain can communicate to another person right down to cell level and give it instructions to heal itself - AND via quantum mechanics. They could claim that one needs to possess certain supernatural powers in order to do this, but for hefty continuous fees, anyone can learn how to do this. Right... Sounds like another Xenu trip to me.

Quite interesting that you mentioned:
Quote
One wonders why they left out "quantum" and "vibrations."


Quote from the website:
Quote
WHAT IS BODYTALK?
BodyTalk is a revolutionary form of alternative healthcare encompassing:

western medical expertise
the energy dynamics of acupuncture
osteopathic and chiropractic philosophy
the clinical findings of Applied Kinesiology
the insights of quantum physics and mathematics


In other words, they have medical expertise, but do not necessarily apply it. These people are Medical Experts and who knows; Medical Doctors! (How can such an authority be incorrect then, and how do I dare question it?)

I have also found some BodyTalk Specialists offering additional services like Reiki and cleansing of "negative vibrations", although I cannot connect this directly to BodyTalk (yet). This provides me with an indication as to the type of practitioner they might attract to perform BodyTalk services.

You also mentioned that:
Quote
The sad (and dangerous) part is that many people are so naive about science that they can't see through this kind of tripe...
and cannot agree more.

It is amazing that science can disprove an irrational belief system on so many levels and fail to convince people to even investigate it for themselves. Other claims made under the guise of science (if not contrary to one's own belief system) is lapped up without scrutiny. I think that once a person believes anything without reason, (s)he will do so no matter how much evidence is provided to the contrary.

Tarring and feathering for those who spread deceitful lies in the name of science and morality, I say! (OK, I must refrain from making reference to tarring and feathering, it's getting old, but at least the lie stops there. Nobody will believe someone dressed in a permanent chicken suit!)

Kind Regards
Sentinel - Watching over others who cannot do so for themselves
Mefiante (August 03, 2007, 15:03:15 PM):
Thank you for your insightful reply.
You're welcome.



To my knowledge, this subject has not been covered by Carte Blanche.

Their website is http://www.bodytalksystem.com (International) and http://www.bodytalksystem.co.za (South Africa)
Okay, thanks for the info ― I'll have a closer gander at it soon.



… one would have to believe in the supernatural in order to believe that one person's brain can communicate to another person right down to cell level and give it instructions to heal itself…
Yes, that really cuts to the heart of the matter: there are too many unproven assumptions in this, so it's safe to conclude that it's a load of cobblers. And when people start talking about Quantum Mechanics in reference to living cells, they're obviously unaware of the huge differences in scale between a cell and where quantum effects start being significant. BTW, thanks for pointing out BodyTalk's reference to "quantum" ― it would have been incomplete woo without it. ;D



In other words, they have medical expertise, but do not necessarily apply it. These people are Medical Experts and who knows; Medical Doctors! (How can such an authority be incorrect then, and how do I dare question it?)
The National Health Service (NHS) in the UK pays for homoeopathic and reflexology treatments, among several other woo-woo arts that fall under the heading of "Complementary and Alternative Medicine" (CAM). Allopaths often include some CAM or even cross over to it completely because it's lucrative and you don't have to do any actual work other than make the patient feel a bit happier than when s/he arrived.



I think that once a person believes anything without reason, (s)he will do so no matter how much evidence is provided to the contrary.
That's the thing: there seems to be a fear that you would lose something or give something important up if you re-evaluate your beliefs against new or discordant evidence. None of us likes it when we are shown to be wrong.



Tarring and feathering for those who spread deceitful lies in the name of science and morality, I say!
Well, personally I've entertained a fondness for public floggings, but you do have a point about the chicken suit. Perhaps we could combine the two: flog 'em publicly with a tarred chicken.

'Luthon64
Sentinel (August 03, 2007, 16:10:49 PM):
The National Health Service (NHS) in the UK pays for homoeopathic and reflexology treatments, among several other woo-woo arts that fall under the heading of "Complementary and Alternative Medicine" (CAM). Allopaths often include some CAM or even cross over to it completely because it's lucrative and you don't have to do any actual work other than make the patient feel a bit happier than when s/he arrived.

Are we not headed in the same direction with Traditional Healers / Sangomas in South Africa becoming a recognised medical practise? I don't know of any medical aids who might me contracted to Sangomas or traditional healers, but apparently they can provide the patient with a valid sick note. Whether this is in our Employment act yet, I'm not sure. I admit that I cannot find any credible reports on this topic, and cannot validate the source of that rumour.

Perhaps we could combine the two: flog 'em publicly with a tarred chicken.

No there's a thought. Stinging, bleeding, burning and feathered... Definitely won't sell WooWoo's again!

Sentinel - Keeping WooWoo's off the shelf

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