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Power balance scam doing the rounds

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Dries van Tonder
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« Reply #45 on: December 23, 2010, 13:24:45 PM »

Go to http://skepticbros.com/placebo-bands/ and buy a placebo-band; great fun  Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy
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Benjammin
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« Reply #46 on: December 26, 2010, 13:57:17 PM »

I think I just saw Morne Morkel wearing one of these *facepalm*
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Mefiante
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« Reply #47 on: December 26, 2010, 15:15:01 PM »

Didn’t you know?  Sportsmen tend to be very superstitious, reading meaning into all sorts of chance happenings.

'Luthon64
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Benjammin
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« Reply #48 on: December 26, 2010, 18:17:44 PM »

Didn’t you know?  Sportsmen tend to be very superstitious, reading meaning into all sorts of chance happenings.

'Luthon64


Interesting list, however magic bracelets aren't superstition, they are quackery. Sportsmen develop odd habits out of a miss assigning of cause and effect, not assigning possible cause to mysterious energy fields (although I am sure some do). Morkel didn't have a great day so hopefully he will put the band down, if he was ever wearing it (really really hope not).
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Mefiante
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« Reply #49 on: December 27, 2010, 11:18:32 AM »

Superstition and quackery, like several other classes of weird things people practice and believe, are different faces of the same underlying phenomenon, namely a receptivity for, and a ready acceptance of various false causalities.  That is, they all come down to errors concerning which things affect one another, and how and to what extent they do so.  In this view, it is then little wonder that sportspeople, being generally superstitious, will also be prone to buying into such duperies as the Power Balance bracelets.

'Luthon64
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ingwe
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« Reply #50 on: December 27, 2010, 14:29:56 PM »

Being a wellknown national sportsman his example will generate sales. I believe that he was presented with it and possibly even is being paid to wear it.
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Wandapec
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« Reply #51 on: December 28, 2010, 11:57:14 AM »

I think I just saw Morne Morkel wearing one of these *facepalm*
Watching the cricket at the moment it looks like they are all wearing one. When I switched on the TV just now I heard Allan Donald complaining to Mike Haysman that Morne Morkel needs to be more consistent in hitting the right spot! :-)It would be great if someone could run some analysis on the various statistics of the cricket player before using and after using the magic bracelet...

The problem with these kind of things is that it is almost like praying and psychics - they remember the hits and forget the misses. If they wear the bracelet and do well, 'What a brilliant bracelet...', if they don't do well, then 'I haven't been wearing it that long, so it hasn't got in tune with my body's natural energy field....'

The sad thing is that although they have been made to retract what they have been saying in Australia, they are still going to be selling their magic bracelets and making a good fortune well into the future....
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AcinonyxScepticus
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« Reply #52 on: December 28, 2010, 15:37:07 PM »

It would be great if someone could run some analysis on the various statistics of the cricket player before using and after using the magic bracelet...


That's a good idea.  If anyone does put in the time to investigate our local cricketers' performance with and without the bracelet, please consider tacking it on to this post at "Bomoko" to start the snowball of data that refutes their claims.

This might become a global effort.  We have so many sceptics available around the globe who can all choose a prominent sports personality and pick the claims apart.

James
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Dries van Tonder
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« Reply #53 on: December 28, 2010, 16:19:41 PM »

Check out this video: Power Balance Bracelets on Today Tonight 22/12/2009. Power balance debunked  Grin Grin
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st0nes
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« Reply #54 on: December 29, 2010, 09:31:41 AM »

From the hologram on these things:
Quote
There's one born every minute
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Faerie
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« Reply #55 on: January 03, 2011, 12:12:50 PM »

The Australians earned some respect:

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The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) ordered Power Balance Australia to reimburse all clients that feel they have been misled by the so-called benefits of the bracelet.
Is has been found that the bracelet consists of ordinary rubber bands and plastic holograms.

http://www.health24.com/news/Fitness/1-911,60325.asp

I see it being advertised for R299 now. I can get a gold bracelet with a charm or two attached for that price, would make me feel much better about myself than a plactic one would.
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Mefiante
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« Reply #56 on: January 03, 2011, 13:53:48 PM »

Would this be a case of “kud-oz”? Wink

'Luthon64
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Rigil Kent
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« Reply #57 on: January 03, 2011, 15:09:53 PM »

The Australians earned some respect:

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The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) ordered Power Balance Australia to reimburse all clients that feel they have been misled by the so-called benefits of the bracelet.
Is has been found that the bracelet consists of ordinary rubber bands and plastic holograms.


Even more worthy of respect would be a nation that just ain't open to misleading claims in the first place. A big bother (I mean brother) is nice to have when you need the band-aid applied, but will he teach you about not coming of the bike again?

Mintaka
« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 15:32:33 PM by Mintaka » Logged
BoogieMonster
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« Reply #58 on: January 03, 2011, 16:16:26 PM »

Well it is nice when big brother in the very least can make a noise about you being a sucker in the first place....
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ingwe
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« Reply #59 on: January 04, 2011, 20:43:42 PM »

The Australians earned some respect:

Quote
The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) ordered Power Balance Australia to reimburse all clients that feel they have been misled by the so-called benefits of the bracelet.
Is has been found that the bracelet consists of ordinary rubber bands and plastic holograms.

http://www.health24.com/news/Fitness/1-911,60325.asp

I see it being advertised for R299 now. I can get a gold bracelet with a charm or two attached for that price, would make me feel much better about myself than a plactic one would.


From Pharngula PJ seems to have a good handle on this scam!!

Power Balance is a company that prospered on gullibility: they sell overpriced silicon rubber wristbands with an imbedded hologram that do absolutely nothing, but which they claimed would enhance athletic performance. And they got suckers to shell out $60 for them.

The law caught up to them and forced them to publicly retract their claims. Here's what you'll find on their website now.

In our advertising we stated that Power Balance wristbands improved your strength, balance and flexibility.

We admit that there is no credible scientific evidence that supports our claims and therefore we engaged in misleading conduct in breach of s52 of the Trade Practices Act 1974.

If you feel you have been misled by our promotions, we wish to unreservedly apologise and offer a full refund.

To obtain a refund please visit our website www.powerbalance.com.au or contact us toll-free on 1800 733 436

This offer will be available until 30th June 2011. To be eligible for a refund, together with return postage, you will need to return a genuine Power Balance product along with proof of purchase (including credit card records, store barcodes and receipts) from an authorised reseller in Australia.

This Corrective Notice has been paid for by Power Balance Australia Pty Ltd and placed pursuant to an undertaking to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission given under section 87B of the Trade Practices Act, 1974.
I'd be jubilant, except that I expect this will make no difference at all to their scam. They're still selling the same old garbage at the same extravagant price.

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