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Which one is modern medicine: Allopathy or Homeopathy?

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Description: allopathy comes 500-700 years back or homeopathy which comes 200-250 years back
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Mefiante
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« Reply #45 on: November 01, 2010, 08:30:52 AM »

I don't think you have now any questions left in your mind
At this time, just two:
  • Do you really think your “evidence” is even vaguely convincing?
  • Are you and Teleological related?

'Luthon64
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charldk
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« Reply #46 on: November 01, 2010, 08:38:48 AM »

Bwhahahaha!

Quote
Jacques Benveniste was once considered to be one of France's most respected biologists, until he was cast adrift from the scientific mainstream. His downfall began in 1988 when he infuriated the scientific community with experimental results which he took as evidence to suggest that water has a memory. His ideas were seized upon by homeopaths keen to find support for their theories on highly diluted medicines, but were condemned by scientific purists. Now, Benveniste believes he has evidence to suggest that it may one day be possible to transmit the curative power of life-saving drugs around the world - via the Internet.

It sounds like science fiction and Benveniste will have a hard time convincing a deeply sceptical world that he is right. Nevertheless, he began his campaign last week when he announced the latest research to come out of his Digital Biology Laboratory near Paris, to a packed audience of scientists at the Pippard Lecture Theatre at Cambridge University's Cavendish Physics Laboratory. Benveniste suggested that the specific effects of biologically active molecules such as adrenalin, nicotine and caffeine, and the immunological signatures of viruses and bacteria, can be recorded and digitised using a computer sound-card. A keystroke later, and these signals can be winging their way across the globe, courtesy of the Internet. Biological systems far away from their activating molecules can then - he suggested - be triggered simply by playing back the recordings.


How someone can actually believe that bullcrap is beyond me.
Even if water has memory how can it suddenly forget all the other crap in the water and only remember the drop of onion juice that was put into a sollution of distilled water as big as the atlantic occean. Because that is the dilutions that some of these 'medicines' claim.

Everyone should be very, very careful of overdosing. I have flushed all my old medicine about a year ago.
If you experience any side effects, of which according to some of them should be very severe if taken in as strong quantities as it being diluted in all the water in South Africa, please contact your physician right away!
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Wandapec
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« Reply #47 on: November 01, 2010, 09:03:15 AM »

Here's the evidence of how homeopathy works?
No, here's the evidence of how homeopathy works - http://www.howdoeshomeopathywork.com/.
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Julian
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« Reply #48 on: November 01, 2010, 20:08:56 PM »

No, here's the evidence of how homeopathy works - http://www.howdoeshomeopathywork.com/.


 Grin Grin
That is my new favourite website.
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Lilli
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« Reply #49 on: November 02, 2010, 07:04:00 AM »

That is my new favourite website.
Brilliant. Mine is http://www.canyoufixmycomputer.com/
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StevoMuso
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« Reply #50 on: November 02, 2010, 08:03:03 AM »


Brilliant. LOL
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GCG
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« Reply #51 on: November 02, 2010, 09:25:23 AM »

yep.  that site sums it up quite nicely.
i recon, close this thread.  no more need be said   Cheesy
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Brian
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« Reply #52 on: November 23, 2010, 07:16:27 AM »

For a good laugh check this site: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/the-lay-scientist/2010/nov/21/1

Quote
The Society of Homeopaths state on their website:

"... it is not possible to take an overdose of homeopathic medicine in the same way as in orthodox medicine (orthodox medicine works on a chemical level).

"Homeopathic medicines are not therefore intrinsically dangerous. Nonetheless, they are clearly capable of stimulating the body's reactive forces powerfully and should be treated with respect."


and here's the challenge to homeopaths:

Quote
So consider this post an open challenge to homeopaths out there:

How does one overdose on homeopathy?
Why are you not campaigning for clearer information on labels?
Are you as a community mature and capable enough to look at the evidence and reach a consensus?

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Lurkie
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« Reply #53 on: November 24, 2010, 22:05:07 PM »

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How does one overdose on homeopathy?


One can overdose on "true" homeopathic remedies, but it will be expensive. Consider the hundreds/thousands of vials of expensive hypnotised-magnetised-santified-twitified-shitified water you'll have to drink. In fact, Wiki calls it water intoxication. Conclusion: homeopathy is poisonous.

Not mentioning those highly addictive little sugar pills flavoured with poison... they make your teeth go bad.
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Mefiante
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« Reply #54 on: November 25, 2010, 09:08:39 AM »

One can overdose on "true" homeopathic remedies, but it will be expensive. Consider the hundreds/thousands of vials of expensive hypnotised-magnetised-santified-twitified-shitified water you'll have to drink.
Hmm, yes, you’re right, but it’s likely that such uncritical belief in homoeopathy will lead to water on the brain well before water intoxication sets in.  In fact, a certain minimum of hydrocephalus appears to be necessary to accept homoeopathy as valid.

'Luthon64
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Lurkie
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« Reply #55 on: November 25, 2010, 12:17:14 PM »

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Hmm, yes, you’re right, but it’s likely that such uncritical belief in homoeopathy will lead to water on the brain well before water intoxication sets in.  In fact, a certain minimum of hydrocephalus appears to be necessary to accept homoeopathy as valid.

Good point. Numbskulls having homeopathic amounts of grey matter are probably not able to suffer from water intoxication if a minimum of brain tissue is required. I wonder if that holds for religious nuts too?  Evil
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« Reply #56 on: November 25, 2010, 12:42:15 PM »

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I wonder if that holds for religious nuts too?  Evil

Yep, it does, I got my mother off her painkiller/sleeping tablet addiction by way of addicting her to homeopathic remedies.... (you ever see the God's pharmacy email doing its rounds?) its not necessarily a cheaper addiction, but I'll probably have her around a tad while longer with her current drugs of choice.
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Lurkie
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« Reply #57 on: November 25, 2010, 14:05:56 PM »

Out of interest, Faerie, what is your mother taking now? Is it completely homeopathic (i.e. non-existent doses of nothing diluted in water) or herbal?

I gather that many herbal supplements get labelled "homeopathic" to speed up the time to market. The SA Medicines and Medical Devices Regulatory Authority have separate procedures for registering allopathic & non-allopathic medicines.

I used to buy an antacid powder called Magen Pulv, which was classified & labelled as homeopathic, when in fact the main ingredient was calcium carbonate (I think ... can't remember properly, except that it tasted like cement).
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Brian
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« Reply #58 on: December 07, 2010, 08:14:24 AM »

for all the answers on the healing powers of water  Evil : http://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/pages/Double-Helix-Water/130104330354368

and here:
http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.doublehelixwater.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2Freports%2FExistance-of-Stable-Water-Clusters.pdf&h=5174d

and the resistance movement "Ban DiHydrogen Oxide"
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Faerie
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« Reply #59 on: December 07, 2010, 08:49:56 AM »

Out of interest, Faerie, what is your mother taking now? Is it completely homeopathic (i.e. non-existent doses of nothing diluted in water) or herbal?


Have'nt a clue as to the names, will have to go check, but its where you need to put 5 drops under the tongue and two drops on your pillowcase at night variety, so probably not herbal. The quack she went to see diagnosed her via her feet.... All very wooy imo.
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