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The PC police running amok

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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2017, 14:22:55 PM »

To the interested reader, I highly recommend Richard Wiseman’s books.  He typically pulls no punches when criticising the deficiencies in his own field.

Thanks for the input mefi... I'll be checking them books out. Smiley
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Mefiante
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In solidarity with rwenzori: Κοπρος φανεται


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« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2017, 15:49:22 PM »

Hmm, on rereading my earlier post, it strikes me that I may have created the impression that Wiseman spends a good part of his time discussing the shortcomings in psychology and its studies.  That’s not the case at all.  Mostly, he writes about experiments, usually his own, and what they signify or imply.  Every so often, he spends a page or two gently critiquing other psychological studies, hypotheses and theories.  These are the moments to which I was referring.

'Luthon64
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2017, 14:46:20 PM »

Some more.

Mefi: Yeah but as mentioned I do for some reason find the subject interesting so it should be a good read nonetheless.
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brianvds
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« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2017, 17:27:13 PM »

Some more.

Mefi: Yeah but as mentioned I do for some reason find the subject interesting so it should be a good read nonetheless.

Soon everyone can be a black lesbian in a wheelchair. :-)
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Spike
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« Reply #19 on: November 06, 2017, 12:59:45 PM »

Holy crap  Shocked - that article reads like a belated April fool's joke!
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #20 on: November 06, 2017, 14:07:37 PM »

Hook, line, and sinker (video). The stupidity of the media is awe-inspiring. You could put a subtext there saying "You're being played" and they still wouldn't realise it.
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brianvds
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« Reply #21 on: November 06, 2017, 16:41:26 PM »

Hook, line, and sinker (video). The stupidity of the media is awe-inspiring. You could put a subtext there saying "You're being played" and they still wouldn't realise it.

Then again, they knew the public would also be played by it. And the public is what makes ratings go up. :-)
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Spike
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« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2017, 17:19:08 PM »

It's a genius campaign.
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brianvds
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« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2017, 06:07:13 AM »

Perhaps only somewhat vaguely connected, but this is from a Facebook post by Nassim Taleb, whose book "Skin in the game" is coming out early next year. In short, social justice consists of making sure everyone accepts their own risks instead of transferring it to others:


The Random House Flap copy. My idea is that a single rule can do more for social justice (and without side effect) than tons of communist regulation. {Random House wrote this, not me}
----
(...), a bold new work that challenges many of our long-held beliefs about risk and reward, politics and religion, finance and personal responsibility.
“Skin in the game means that you do not pay attention to what people say, only to what they do, and how much of their neck they are putting on the line.”
In his most provocative and practical book yet, [...] redefines what it means to understand the world, succeed in a profession, contribute to a fair and just society, detect nonsense, and influence others. Citing examples ranging from Hammurabi to Seneca, Antaeus the Giant to Donald Trump, Nassim Nicholas Taleb shows how the willingness to accept one's own risks is an essential attribute of heroes, saints, and flourishing people in all walks of life.
As always both accessible and iconoclastic, Taleb challenges long-held beliefs about the values of those who spearhead military interventions, make financial investments, and propagate religious faiths. Among his insights:
• For social justice, focus on symmetry and risk sharing. You cannot make profits and transfer the risks to others, as bankers and large corporations do. You cannot get rich without owning your own risk and paying for your own losses. Forcing skin in the game corrects this asymmetry better than thousands of laws and regulations.
• Ethical rules aren’t universal. You’re part of a group larger than you, but it’s still smaller than humanity in general.
• Minorities, not majorities, run the world. The world is not run by consensus but by stubborn minorities asymmetrically imposing their tastes and ethics on others.
• You can be an intellectual yet still be an idiot. “Educated philistines” have been wrong on everything from Stalinism to Iraq to low carb diets.
• Beware of complicated solutions (that someone was paid to find). A simple barbell can build muscle better than expensive new machines.
• True religion is commitment, not just faith. How much you believe is only manifested by what you’re willing to sacrifice for it.
The phrase “skin in the game” is one we have often heard, but have rarely stopped to truly dissect. It is the backbone of risk management, but it’s also an astonishingly complex worldview that, as Taleb shows in this book, applies to literally all aspects of our lives. As Taleb says, “The symmetry of Skin in the game is a simple rule that’s necessary for fairness and justice and the ultimate BS-buster,” and “Never trust anyone who doesn’t have skin in the game. Without it, fools and crooks will benefit, and their mistakes will never come back to haunt them.”
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