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Brewing

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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #30 on: July 22, 2020, 11:40:16 AM »

I'm probably due an update:

My 1st beer, while lovely at first, has kindof an off-note I still can't place. I've read countless internet articles trying to describe off flavours but with no luck finding something that matches or makes sense. Finding the words to describe it is also not being very successful. It's distinct but also hard to describe. However, it gets you buzzing, and is not a bad beer. I just would love to know how to eliminate this one minor aspect of it. Because...

That note is still there in my 2nd batch, but is not as prevalent, making it a lovely, fruity, dark amber beer to drink... Frankly I love it, and it has a bit more punch than I'd expected. I'd say it's fairly par-for-the-beer-course, and after a draught-sized helping I get plenty tipsy. One thing it lacks is "head", though it is plenty fizzy. And, of course, still that feint off note I'd like to remove completely.. But a huge improvement. (Aging isn't helping on this particular one, but keep reading...)

Though I've now taken a different direction and am trying to produce a German Wheat beer. That effort is coming along nicely "at first taste".

As for the Pineapple brew, I still have some and it seems to be aging very well. It seems better every time I taste it, and any "wild" flavours that it had initially are waning. (I did make a ton of the stuff and seeing as I now have beers also... it's being neglected just enough)

I've kindof just left my Cider to age in a dark corner and at last taste I can say it's millimeters off from a traditional Savannah. Keen on bottling it soon.

Mead... Mead keeps bubbling but the gravity is still very high and it's still very sweet many months on.... I may re-pitch yeast in it soon.

What a great new hobby!

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brianvds
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« Reply #31 on: July 22, 2020, 13:20:09 PM »

Me, I decided it's easier to give up on drinking alcohol than to try achieving any appreciable alcohol content with baker's yeast. Yes, yes, I know, everyone easily gets 10%, but I can't work out how. Mine stubbornly refuses. It galls me to give in to bureaucratic rules like this, but there you go.

If I do ever attempt it again, I'm going to go for natural yeast from grapes.
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Rigil Kent
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« Reply #32 on: July 22, 2020, 14:17:13 PM »

Nice going Boogie! Or should I say, nice bru. (get it?)

My attempt at malting barley turned out a disaster - some lactobacillus took over where the yeast should have been, turning the whole pot hugely acidic. Alcohol content was negligible.  

But we persevere and I am now repeating the exercise using corn. Just started sprouting yesterday. The idea is to make whiskey from a green malt.
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #33 on: July 22, 2020, 14:58:15 PM »

Nice going Boogie! Or should I say, nice bru. (get it?)

Ja hey...

Quote
My attempt at malting barley turned out a disaster - some lactobacillus took over where the yeast should have been, turning the whole pot hugely acidic. Alcohol content was negligible.

But we persevere and I am now repeating the exercise using corn. Just started sprouting yesterday. The idea is to make whiskey from a green malt.

Do you still subject the mash to a boil?
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Rigil Kent
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« Reply #34 on: July 22, 2020, 15:32:42 PM »

Do you still subject the mash to a boil?
I'm going to let the 8kg corn sprout for maybe a week, then mill it wet and unkilned through a Kenwood. Then I'm going to add some water and
incubate the mash at 60 - 65 deg for an hour to try and persuade the starchy endosperm to turn sugary. Any hotter and the amylase may denature.
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #35 on: July 22, 2020, 15:37:09 PM »

Do you still subject the mash to a boil?
I'm going to let the 8kg corn sprout for maybe a week, then mill it wet and unkilned through a Kenwood. Then I'm going to add some water and
incubate the mash at 60 - 65 deg for an hour to try and persuade the starchy endosperm to turn sugary. Any hotter and the amylase may denature.

For beer you'd boil wort after the mashing (carb -> sugar) step to kill any (esp lacto) bacteria before you infuse with yeast. At that point denaturing the amylase is moot. However I guess in this case you're trying to utilise natural yeast already in the grain?
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Rigil Kent
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« Reply #36 on: July 22, 2020, 15:54:49 PM »

No not trying natural yeast again soon. I'll give it a good dose Pick n Pay yeast this time round. Will try boiling and then pitch once its cool to, say, 40deg.
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