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Tweefo
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« on: September 10, 2011, 14:10:24 PM »

This week saw my bakkie's mileage clicking over to 384,403 km. This is the average distance to the Moon. How far can a vehicle go? This is now a sort of challenge to me. I will call it a day when the engine or gearbox go - so far so good. Of course there was a few problems like CV joints, shocks the battery and so on but nothing serious. How many of you can claim this or better?
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Rigil Kent
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« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2011, 17:45:44 PM »

Not me ... I was never able to clock more than 100k without itching for something else. The most I ever managed was with my second car, a 1992 Ford Bantam bakkie. Bought it with 32k on the odometer, and sold it at about 125k.

Your's diesel?

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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2011, 22:39:57 PM »

Well I used to have this beetle that had "wrapped around" on the mile-meter. How many digits it was, or what the total was eventually, I'm unsure. But the car was old, very old, and had driven the "Transvaal <-> Cape Town" route often, it was in my family from the start, so I know it's history, being bought in 1969 (long before my birth) until we finally, reluctantly, sold it after me and my sibling had used it as "varsity transport". It was still very much original - now a true "collectors beetle" - around 2003-ish.

I now own 2 bmers, one of which (a 2001 e46) is sitting around 280k, and I have no intention of selling it. I actually recently had it's clutch replaced and the mecchie's jaw dropped when he saw it was still the factory original.

And lastly, my parents have this early-90's corolla that is just refusing to die, my best guess is it must be around 450-500k.

We have a way of making a car pay for itself.
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Faerie
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« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2011, 07:42:42 AM »

I had a little beaten up Ford laser many years ago, I recall "clocking" it three times, but not the exact milage.  The engine finally blew up (literally) in front of a Toyota dealership, and I considered it devine intervention, as I simply walked in and bought myself a little Tazz - which my son is now driving, and that one has been around the clock once too. I'm of the ilk that one should drive a car until it's not able to go anymore, or it becomes too expensive to maintain, whichever comes sooner. With the right care there is no reason a car should'nt last you a good 15 years or so.
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Mandarb
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« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2011, 14:46:01 PM »

Lol. Only had two cars, first one was a Citi Golf that I bought from my dad at 130k, sold it at 195k because I was itching to get something new that had some oomph. Had that for 4 years now. It's a turbo diesel, so will have to see what happens when I pay it off, and see if I want the risk of a blown turbo. But I've also had a itch for something new, but that is just boredom with the norm.
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st0nes
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« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2011, 16:37:56 PM »

There are three car owning strategies:

1) Buy a skedonk very cheap and drive it until it dies.  This is the most economical if you can do your own repairs, so it's the mechanical DIY artist's strategy of choice.

2) Buy a brand new car and drive it until a major component (engine or gear box) gives way, then buy another one.  This is the strategy I follow, and usually my cars last about 15 years or 200,000km before that happens.  I have noticed that each succeeding car lasts a bit longer; I'm not sure whether that is because cars are getting better, or because I'm becoming a better driver as I get older.  The advantage of this is that you can buy your car for cash, thus avoiding interest costs.

3) Buy a new car and trade it in for a new one every year or so.  This is expensive and only for insecure individuals who care disproportionately about what strangers think of them, or who are reps and on the road eight hours a day.

My current car has just completed its first 100,000km and is good for at least that much again.  I think I'll be in the market again around 2017.
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2011, 16:54:08 PM »

Actually, I find the most oft-used reason for strategy 3 (in my generation) is the "service plan fear freak-out".

These people believe if it's not in service plan it can explode at any given second, so they buy shittier cars (think Korean) at inflated costs because "it has service plan". So they buy a new car, then once it's almost paid off, they sell it at a huge loss and buy another one brand new (at a huge markup). This is by far the best strategy for burning money imho, though these people are immune to the fear of having no retirement money.
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Rigil Kent
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« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2011, 19:42:58 PM »

... it was in my family from the start... now a true "collectors beetle" - around 2003-ish.

Hey, I think I saw you guys in that old VW commercial!

...trade it in for a new one every year or so.  This is expensive and only for insecure individuals who care disproportionately about what strangers think of them

Such nonsense. I'm an insecure individual who cares disproportionately about what my friends think of me. Tongue

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Faerie
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« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2011, 06:48:39 AM »

though these people are immune to the fear of having no retirement money.

Aaaarrggghhh.... lets not go there!  Sad

# 2 is basically my strategy, and it ensured that I could afford to give my eldest a car for his 18th, the same will go (barring accidents) for my youngest, the hubby's car will be inherited and hubby will get a new one in around 4 years time. I'd never have been able to give my kids cars if I went for strategy # 3. As for what other's think of me, well, everybody seems to think we're really well off because of the amount of vehicles parked in the yard overnight.
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2011, 12:14:30 PM »

I guess I work with strategy 1, but not entirely. I don't buy "skedonks".

I buy really nice cars that are juuust out of motorplan. Then I maintain those until they really start literally falling apart. You can find cars like this that are practically new mechanically yet have depreciated very significantly due to the service plan freak-out. For instance, my current car is "out of motorplan" and almost unsellable due to it's combination of exclusivity and "not being warrantied"-ness. Yet it hasn't even hit 70k on the clock... That's the difference between paying 1/2 a bar, or 150k, for a stunning, mechanically sound, "executive" car. Moreover, on 2nd hand models any extra's come free, so you shop around for one that is kitted out to the hilt, and you pay very little extra for what would've cost a fortune to the guy who bought the car in the first place.

"But maintaining those high-spec cars must be murderous!" - No, it'll be a fraction as expensive as buying a new, inferior, one. unless you really suck at checking out used cars before buying.
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st0nes
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« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2011, 12:19:30 PM »

I don't buy "skedonks".
Nope.  You buy schedonques.
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benguela
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« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2011, 13:04:18 PM »

I'm with BM, "buy one just out of motorplan". Bought my 2000 Subaru Forester in 2003 for cheap, still going strong, best car I've ever had. Being a weekend warrior adrenaline sports addict, I abuse it quite bit by driving on dirt roads most weekends.



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Zulumoose
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« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2011, 13:40:09 PM »

I tend to buy a 'sensible' car fairly new and drive it as long as I feel it is reliable, maintaining it myself when out of warranty. I have limited options as I am required to use a car for work and there are conditions on the car allowance, technically I am not supposed to have a car older than 6 years or more than 200,000km.

My last 3 cars in order

Citigolf 1800 1995 model, 180,000km on clock when stolen, one fuel pump failure R60 and 5 minutes to replace. Engine and gearbox/clutch never opened.

Jetta 3 1600 1999 model, 302,000km on clock when traded in, one CV joint replaced, engine and gearbox/clutch never opened.

Polo 2006, 177,000km on clock currently, two wheel bearings replaced under warranty, engine/gearbox/clutch never opened. Average fuel consumption 6.8l/100km

I am likely to replace the polo with a new one in about 18 months - 2 years. I want a boot and a low price so may go Vivo classic, but the fuel consumption of the bluemotion is also tempting with the mileage I do, only available as hatchback.
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GCG
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« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2011, 14:24:07 PM »

In an ideal world, i would buy a new car, with a service plan.  but as of yet, i have not been 'ahem' wealthy enough to do just that.
every vehicle i have driven, was bought by parentals, or hand-me-down from parentals/family.
currently driving a honda balade.  she goes and goes.  lovely car.  blixemed into house after the mechanic 'adjusted' the handbrake.  my ass.
now, i am looking to pimp her.  saw some really nice headlights.  need new tyres.  might invest in some new seats.  the exhaust is reminiscent of the cape flats.
so very torn between what needs love first.
i will drive her untill she falls apart.  or, i might just leave her to rest under the carport, and get a scooter to go where i need to be (since i need only to get to the gautrain station right now), and leave her for the longer trips.
i want to (if i dont murder him before then) make my s/o's mum an offer for her mini cooper in time.  she doesnt drive much.  and i looooove the mini cooper.
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Brian
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« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2011, 07:22:36 AM »

Bought my LR Defender 130 new in 1998. It now has 540000 kms on the clock and I'm in the process of replacing the engine. No other hassles. Still in original shape and it has travelled far and wide in darkest Africa...Serengeti etc. Will keep it until I hit 1 million k's. I also have a T-bird 5l V8 1980 classic car that is in full running shape. It is of interest to know that spares for this car are easily obtainable from the shelf in most cases but if I need to import something like the V-belts, Ford have the car's VIN number in the US and within 10 days I have the part. Also, in 1980 the car was built for unleaded fuel!
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