On programming

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benguela (May 31, 2011, 19:48:06 PM):
I see there are javascript demo comps these days. :) Not very impressive though, but I guess it is js.

Check this out, 1k demos still going strong (turn up your volume, requires sound)


Tracie by TBC


Lurkie (May 31, 2011, 21:47:09 PM):
so, ummm.... How many programmers are on this forum??? :/

Anyone for COBOL? ;)

Like Mandarb, I'm not at the level of assembler ( way too lazy ) and I never got my head around C or C++, but I have made my living programming in BASIC ( post-COBOL LOL! ), contract programming and selling shareware, way back when. Now just hobby projects for me and friends.

Hooray for COBOL and FORTRAN! Wasn't COBOL designed for business/finance related problems?

Interestingly (at least, for me) there is lots and lots and lots of fresh and legacy scientific code out there that is still written in FORTRAN - even the FORTRAN-4 column dependent kind.

I had a bit of a nightmare some years ago trying to use "Digital" FORTRAN that promised to allow me to make nice, Windows user interfaces. Big disaster! Had to write endless code just to create the usual "Hello world" app. I gave that up as a joke and then tried Visual Basic for the interface passing parameters to a FORTRAN DLL to do the number crunching. Yuk yuk yuk.

After a few months of hair-pulling my S/O introduced me to Delphi. I first tried the parameter passing thing but bashed my head against the row vs column dominant problem, so switched into Delphi completely. Delphi has been great and allows me to paddle in the shallow and deep-end of the pool. But I miss "Numerical recipes"...
st0nes (June 01, 2011, 07:11:50 AM):
so, ummm.... How many programmers are on this forum??? :/
I used to be (database applications), but now I run a gym.
BoogieMonster (June 01, 2011, 10:28:06 AM):
Quote from: Mefiante
One of the most horrendous bits of OOP I’ve ever seen was actually done by a computer science graduate. ..... you have to wonder how on earth the offender managed to graduate.

Welcome to the headache that is developer hiring. A degree don't make a programmer, no ma'am. The world over industry is left disillusioned by what is churned out by universities. Somehow I always get the feeling that varsity professors have NO IDEA what industry wants and needs. The cynic in me thinks they don't care, they're teaching SCIENCE damnit! Not craft!

The point is if you can code your way to getting the correct result for an assignment you get a passing mark and move on, no matter how horrendous your code is (as a tutor I once got rapped over the knuckles for being "too hard" on the student's projects).

In fact it's the craft that is sought after, a varsity that achieves it will have awesome post-degree hiring rates at higher salaries, guaranteed.
st0nes (June 01, 2011, 10:53:49 AM):
Quote from: Mefiante
One of the most horrendous bits of OOP I’ve ever seen was actually done by a computer science graduate. ..... you have to wonder how on earth the offender managed to graduate.

Welcome to the headache that is developer hiring. A degree don't make a programmer, no ma'am. The world over industry is left disillusioned by what is churned out by universities. Somehow I always get the feeling that varsity professors have NO IDEA what industry wants and needs. The cynic in me thinks they don't care, they're teaching SCIENCE damnit! Not craft!

The point is if you can code your way to getting the correct result for an assignment you get a passing mark and move on, no matter how horrendous your code is (as a tutor I once got rapped over the knuckles for being "too hard" on the student's projects).

In fact it's the craft that is sought after, a varsity that achieves it will have awesome post-degree hiring rates at higher salaries, guaranteed.
Quite. I have an arts degree (English & Philosophy) and a Master Mariner's certificate. When I wanted to go into IT I went to Van Zyl & Pritchard (are they still going?) and did a COBOL course. I've never used COBOL in anger; my first job was Informix 4gl, since then I've used Progress, Python
and Oracle too. A six month course that concentrates on the practical aspects of programming trumps a CS degree unless you want to go and work in Intel's R&D department or something similar. Businesses want to send their customers invoices, they don't want to 'model the real world'.

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