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 1 
 on: Yesterday at 06:11:36 
Started by Tweefo - Last post by brianvds
But it is warming up a bit lately. At least around these joburg parts.

We haven't had much in the wy of winter yet, though I'm told there's a cold front on its way. After the summer we had, I was hoping for positively arctic weather, but alas, global warming seems to have kicked in now.

Quote
Tweefo is astronomy geek Jesus: He froze for our grins.

He looks slightly older than his early thirties; I must assume he has managed to avoid the wrath of established interests thus far.


 2 
 on: July 15, 2019, 13:43:54 PM 
Started by Tweefo - Last post by BoogieMonster
But it is warming up a bit lately. At least around these joburg parts.

Tweefo is astronomy geek Jesus: He froze for our grins.

 3 
 on: July 14, 2019, 10:11:35 AM 
Started by Tweefo - Last post by Tweefo
Great stuff! Now is the perfect time of year for sky viewing - pity you can't do it without freezing solid though. :-)
Long Johns, tracksuit pants and a pair of jeans. Long sleeve vest, T-shirt, 3 jackets. Wool lined hat with ear flaps and one of the jackets got a hoody that goes over the hat. Gloves and 2 pairs of socks in hiking boots. You sit out there for 4 to 5 hours, so it still gets cold.

 4 
 on: July 14, 2019, 09:43:06 AM 
Started by Tweefo - Last post by brianvds
Great stuff! Now is the perfect time of year for sky viewing - pity you can't do it without freezing solid though. :-)

 5 
 on: July 14, 2019, 09:29:41 AM 
Started by Tweefo - Last post by Tweefo
Last night.


 6 
 on: July 13, 2019, 06:31:06 AM 
Started by brianvds - Last post by brianvds
You could be putting your child off reading – here’s how to change that

https://www.parent24.com/Storytime/you-could-be-putting-your-child-off-reading-heres-how-to-change-that-20190711


Short version: Let your kid choose what he wants top read. And "make it fun."

I tend to agree on the first idea, but I have misgivings about this notion that education should be fun. It's not wrong if it happens to be fun. But there are many activities in life which are necessary, or meaningful, or both, that are not necessarily really fun as such, and shouldn't be advertised as such either.

What say you?

I think at the younger ages kids simply won't do it if it isn't fun. Depends on the age. There does come a time that they have to "grow up" a bit but you can't expect that from toddlers.

It is indeed probably age related. Most people don't try to get their toddlers to read anyway. My own experience as teacher taught me this: very few kids can really read. Simply being able to make the right sounds in the right places is not the same thing as being able to read. Learning to actually read takes some talent, and like most other skills, a huge amount of practice, which most kids don't want to put in because they like reading about as much as most kids like to be forced to take piano lessons. Except, unlike piano lessons, literacy is kind of essential, and thus it has to be rammed down their throats, one way or another.

I'm kind of glad I am mostly out of the teaching business. :-)

 7 
 on: July 12, 2019, 16:37:07 PM 
Started by brianvds - Last post by BoogieMonster
You could be putting your child off reading – here’s how to change that

https://www.parent24.com/Storytime/you-could-be-putting-your-child-off-reading-heres-how-to-change-that-20190711


Short version: Let your kid choose what he wants top read. And "make it fun."

I tend to agree on the first idea, but I have misgivings about this notion that education should be fun. It's not wrong if it happens to be fun. But there are many activities in life which are necessary, or meaningful, or both, that are not necessarily really fun as such, and shouldn't be advertised as such either.

What say you?

I think at the younger ages kids simply won't do it if it isn't fun. Depends on the age. There does come a time that they have to "grow up" a bit but you can't expect that from toddlers.

 8 
 on: July 12, 2019, 08:03:50 AM 
Started by brianvds - Last post by brianvds
You could be putting your child off reading – here’s how to change that

https://www.parent24.com/Storytime/you-could-be-putting-your-child-off-reading-heres-how-to-change-that-20190711


Short version: Let your kid choose what he wants top read. And "make it fun."

I tend to agree on the first idea, but I have misgivings about this notion that education should be fun. It's not wrong if it happens to be fun. But there are many activities in life which are necessary, or meaningful, or both, that are not necessarily really fun as such, and shouldn't be advertised as such either.

What say you?

 9 
 on: July 11, 2019, 07:34:04 AM 
Started by Tweefo - Last post by Mefiante
How the Moon-landing “hoax” came to be, and why it persists.

'Luthon64

 10 
 on: July 08, 2019, 17:24:17 PM 
Started by brianvds - Last post by Mefiante
Just about everyone fills their god-shaped hole with something, though it does depend on what exactly we mean by that god-shaped hole. If it consists of a sense of meaning or purpose, or perhaps "oneness with all" or being in the presence of the numinous, then I would think that lots of people who have no use for supernatural entities still understand what it means to have a "religious experience."
I’m not so sure.  This take on things supplies the core of the argument that religious believers like to think licenses them to declare that “Atheism is just another religion.”  Ignoring all of the unstated specious assumptions about what atheism is (i.e., allegedly a belief system positively claiming the non-existence of any deity), there must come a point in a rational agent’s development of experience and knowledge where these observations are realised to be far more likely a reflection of human psychology than of some pervasive reality.  I agree to the extent that I doubt that there are very many people who will claim never to have had a “spiritual” experience, just as I don’t doubt that most of them will ascribe such experiences to some supervening reality outside of themselves.  My point is simply that in this light, such experiences are understood as not being able to fill any “god-shaped hole” because such a hole is itself a chimera.

I would think religion also, to some extent, serves as the glue that binds communities together, or that separates "us" from "them."
This point I agree with wholeheartedly.  It’s long been my contention that religions, contrary to their oft-stated puffery and self-aggrandisements, are insidiously divisive by fostering and actively encouraging us-and-them mindsets.  The mild version:  “You’re part of our group—just as long as you subscribe to the notions we all hold dear; challenge us, and you’re out!”

'Luthon64

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