Awesome comet incoming

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BoogieMonster (September 29, 2012, 13:58:03 PM):
Quote from: /.
"If astronomers' early predictions hold true, the holidays next year may hold a glowing gift for stargazers—a superbright comet, just discovered streaking near Saturn. Even with powerful telescopes, comet 2012 S1 (ISON) is now just a faint glow in the constellation Cancer. But the ball of ice and rocks might become visible to the naked eye for a few months in late 2013 and early 2014—perhaps outshining the moon, astronomers say. The comet is already remarkably bright, given how far it is from the sun, astronomer Raminder Singh Samra said. What's more, 2012 S1 seems to be following the path of the Great Comet of 1680, considered one of the most spectacular ever seen from Earth."


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/09/120927-new-comet-2012-s1-ison-science-space-moon/

brianvds (September 29, 2012, 14:56:10 PM):
Comets do, however, sometimes fizzle, so I won't get my hopes up yet. But I find them among the coolest natural phenomena anyway, even when they are so dim I need binoculars to see them.

Tweefo (September 29, 2012, 16:13:16 PM):
This is going to be a Northern hemisphere object. :(
Hermes (September 30, 2012, 11:06:58 AM):
Wat is quite amazing, is that Pastor Paul Begley wrote about this comet in a novel, and now it has come true:
Begley says that in his fiction book, Mark of the Beast RFID, he wrote of a coming asteroid that brought great fear upon the Earth. "This is the fifth thing that has come true after the book was written. This is kind of blowing my mind," he said.

"Are you saved?" he asks. "Now we know that this comet, it's 615 million miles away, is on its way.

Uhm, he actually wrote about an asteroid, not a comet, but maybe pointing it out is pedantic?
Mefiante (September 30, 2012, 11:32:14 AM):
Uhm, he actually wrote about an asteroid, not a comet, but maybe pointing it out is pedantic?
Not at all. If nothing else, pointing it out will perhaps draw attention to the ridiculously loose standards and preposterously wide margins by which soothsayers call their prognostications “hits”. When the comet fails to hit Earth in a year or so, we won’t be hearing any retractions from chumps like Begley. They will either be very quiet or full to bursting with excuses, depending on how much discretion they are capable of. In Begley’s case, I’ll bet on the latter.

'Luthon64

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