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No "seas" on far side

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Tweefo
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« on: June 11, 2014, 15:05:44 PM »

I am still sceptical about this explanation. http://www.universetoday.com/112459/mystery-solved-why-there-no-lunar-seas-on-the-far-side-of-the-moon/
I can not see that the Earth's heat could radiate all the way to the Moon. The Moon was closer in the past, but still..
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st0nes
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« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2014, 15:34:27 PM »

I am still sceptical about this explanation. http://www.universetoday.com/112459/mystery-solved-why-there-no-lunar-seas-on-the-far-side-of-the-moon/
I can not see that the Earth's heat could radiate all the way to the Moon. The Moon was closer in the past, but still..

Was the moon tidally 'locked' from its formation?  If so, this explanation is quite plausible, if not, not.
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Mefiante
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« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2014, 15:51:51 PM »

Remember also that the Moon is receding from Earth and has been doing so since its formation.  At the time of its formation, it would have been considerably closer.  Moreover, the process of it becoming tidally locked would have “kneaded” the nearer side of the Moon more, thereby inducing frictional body heat in addition to the radiant heat from the cooling Earth, which had no atmosphere early on and so there was little to absorb the heat that it was radiating.

'Luthon64
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Tweefo
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« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2014, 16:11:18 PM »

But only became tidally locked later on, as it was moving away from Earth.
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brianvds
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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2014, 18:28:46 PM »

Is there any reason why it couldn't possibly just be coincidence that the far side is rough? What do we see on other tidally locked moons in the solar system? Could they cast some light on this?
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Mefiante
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« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2014, 08:02:27 AM »

If it is a coincidence, it’s a most remarkable one.  Other planets’ moons may not be helpful in pointing towards an explanation because they are thought to be remnants or “crumbs” of planet formation processes (coalescence), rather than the collision of large celestial objects.

'Luthon64
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2014, 17:19:47 PM »



By the way, that hypothesis has had it's first bit of evidence surface recently.
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Tweefo
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« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2014, 15:43:54 PM »

I did not realise that the moon's rotation slowed down that fast. Here is a bit more on the two faces of the moon. http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2014/07/01/the_moon_s_two_faces_why_are_they_so_different.html
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brianvds
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« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2014, 05:33:32 AM »

If it is a coincidence, it’s a most remarkable one.  Other planets’ moons may not be helpful in pointing towards an explanation because they are thought to be remnants or “crumbs” of planet formation processes (coalescence), rather than the collision of large celestial objects.

'Luthon64


Currently, the earth's continents are all on one side of the planet, with a huge ocean covering the other side. Of course not analogous to the lunar situation, but before we solve mysteries, we must be careful to make absolutely sure that there really is a mystery to solve.
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Mefiante
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« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2014, 08:08:41 AM »

The Earth is less perfectly spherical than the Moon and, unlike the latter, is still subject to significant ongoing tectonic and complex internal geophysical processes.  The Moon’s internal structure is also considerably simpler than the Earth’s.

Wheedling out the right questions to ask in order that science can progress is indeed often both more important and trickier than answering them.

'Luthon64
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BoogieMonster
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« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2014, 09:48:35 AM »

Currently, the earth's continents are all on one side of the planet, with a huge ocean covering the other side.

The Earth [is] still subject to significant ongoing tectonic and complex internal geophysical processes.

My thoughts exactly. The continents were once one, broke apart, and started spreading out... and are still spreading out. Going out on a limb: One day they may well be equally distributed around the globe.
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Brian
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« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2014, 10:00:56 AM »

Quote
One day they may well be equally distributed around the globe.
...and then all crash against each other one day? Some large mountain ranges no doubt will follow.
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Mefiante
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« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2014, 10:58:33 AM »

India is busy crashing into the rest of Asia, hence the Himalayas.  Africa is crashing into Europe, hence the Alps.  The Nazca and Antarctic plates are being thrust under the South American plate (i.e., another collision), hence the Andes.

'Luthon64
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brianvds
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« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2014, 14:36:13 PM »

The continents will probably eventually bunch together in a supercontinent again? Anyway, my point was just that there needn't necessarily be any very special reason why a planet is asymmetrical.

But I am biased, because I recently read yet another article in which a researcher goes to great lengths to solve what is in fact a non-mystery:

http://boingboing.net/2014/06/10/vermeers-paintings-might-be.html
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cr1t
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« Reply #14 on: July 02, 2014, 14:41:23 PM »

But I am biased, because I recently read yet another article in which a researcher goes to great lengths to solve what is in fact a non-mystery:

http://boingboing.net/2014/06/10/vermeers-paintings-might-be.html


I watched that docie it was produced by Penn and Teller the magicians.

I though it was very well done.
I don't think they claim anything other than to say.
This is possible a certain way and to do it.

Tim does not come across as a researcher rather just some body that had an idea he wanted to try out.
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