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John McCain - the anti-science candidate

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Description: How he will ruin science education and research
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mdg
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« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2008, 20:14:09 PM »

Quote from: scienceteacherinexile
mdg,
You must be slow....

I know a few people who will agree with you on that.  Wink

Quote from:  scienceteacherinexile
On the serious side, McCain continues to hemorrage supports, but I am still not breathing completely easy yet.

I agree with you. I've been following the candidates quite closely, I have a friend in Indianappolis and we chat a few times a week, so I get news from her perspective too. I was very glad to see Colin Powell come out in support of Obama. My concern is that although people may say they're supporting him, they may change their minds when they vote and decide that they're not ready for a black President.


The last sentence in that link you added stood out:-

 
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We are all sufferers from history, but the paranoid is a double sufferer, since he is afflicted not only by the real world, with the rest of us, but by his fantasies as well.

That's so true.

BTW, I don't post often, but I read the forum daily and just wanted to say that some of us did miss you and welcome back.  Grin

mdg
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scienceteacheragain
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« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2008, 22:59:44 PM »

So far it is still looking positive Smiley
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scienceteacheragain
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« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2008, 23:47:42 PM »

Again, sorry I am thrashing the forum with the US elections, but it is getting close, and no one is forced to read my crap  Grin
I actually didn't know there was a term for what I have discussed with many people here including with 'Luthon64 in this thread, but it is called the Bradley effect when people say they will vote for someone, but then do not because of skin color. 
Some don't think it will have any effect on results as opposed to polling data for Obama.
Let's hope he is correct.
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bluegray
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« Reply #18 on: October 25, 2008, 12:26:34 PM »

Again, sorry I am thrashing the forum with the US elections, but it is getting close, and no one is forced to read my crap  Grin
No, please continue. It's very relevant to all of us. I'm sure anyone concerned with the role of science and religion in modern society is keeping an eye on this one...
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mdg
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« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2008, 10:28:25 AM »

I picked this up from Pharyngula this morning; it's probably one of the reasons why McCain couldn't tell the difference between and overhead projector and a planetarium projector.

Quote
Dear friends, In these times, with extremely serious, complicated crisises confronting us both economically and internationally, we need to have intelligent, educated people as president & vice president:

Educational Background:

Barack Obama:
Columbia University - B.A.
Political Science with a Specialization in
International Relations.
Harvard - Juris Doctor (J.D.) Magna Cum Laude

Joseph Biden:
University of Delaware - B.A. in History and B.A. in Political Science.
Syracuse University College of Law - Juris Doctor (J.D.)

vs.

John McCain:
United States Naval Academy - Class rank: 894 of 899

Sarah Palin:
Hawaii Pacific University - 1 semester
North Idaho College - 2 semesters - general study
University of Idaho - 2 semesters - journalism
Matanuska-Susitna College - 1 semester
University of Idaho - 3 semesters - B.A. in Journalism
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Bullitt
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« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2008, 16:36:20 PM »

I saw that too.  It is scary that someone with so little education could become president.  It should almost become mandatory that a president has at least a Masters degree (or some other sort of highly regarded post-graduate diploma).
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scienceteacheragain
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« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2008, 16:51:38 PM »

Obviously, the formal education does not make the person.  You can look anywhere and find people with good credentials but without a clue (can anyone say "Behe"?).
To have a truly democratic process, you absolutely can't put on restrictions like that.  However, you would hope that people would use common sense and realise that it is usually better to have educated representation than otherwise.
I usually just find it disturbing that there are so many people who don't.   If you have followed the US presidential race, you will remember how the Republicans have portrayed Obamama as "elitist" and that he thinks he is better than the "average American".  I have made the point several times, that I (as an American) do not want the "average American" in the oval office.  I DO want someone who is more clued up on how things work in politics.  Not someone who is in it for themself alone, but yeah, someone who is better educated, has more experience, etc., than the "average American". 
This willful ignorance that the the Republicans have portrayed as a virtue is vile.
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Bullitt
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« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2008, 16:57:52 PM »

Obviously, the formal education does not make the person.  You can look anywhere and find people with good credentials but without a clue (can anyone say "Behe"?).
To have a truly democratic process, you absolutely can't put on restrictions like that.  However, you would hope that people would use common sense and realise that it is usually better to have educated representation than otherwise.
I usually just find it disturbing that there are so many people who don't.   If you have followed the US presidential race, you will remember how the Republicans have portrayed Obamama as "elitist" and that he thinks he is better than the "average American".  I have made the point several times, that I (as an American) do not want the "average American" in the oval office.  I DO want someone who is more clued up on how things work in politics.  Not someone who is in it for themself alone, but yeah, someone who is better educated, has more experience, etc., than the "average American". 
This willful ignorance that the the Republicans have portrayed as a virtue is vile.


It makes me think of a quote in this article from the NY Times (see paragraph 2, page 2).

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“She’s [Sarah Palin] always talking about the ‘Average Joe,’ ” Jeremy Long said. “Average me! I don’t want myself in the Oval Office. I want someone smarter.”
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mdg
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« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2008, 07:26:59 AM »

Quote from: scienceteacherinexile
Obviously, the formal education does not make the person.  You can look anywhere and find people with good credentials but without a clue (can anyone say "Behe"?).
To have a truly democratic process, you absolutely can't put on restrictions like that.  However, you would hope that people would use common sense and realise that it is usually better to have educated representation than otherwise.
I usually just find it disturbing that there are so many people who don't.   If you have followed the US presidential race, you will remember how the Republicans have portrayed Obamama as "elitist" and that he thinks he is better than the "average American".  I have made the point several times, that I (as an American) do not want the "average American" in the oval office.  I DO want someone who is more clued up on how things work in politics.  Not someone who is in it for themself alone, but yeah, someone who is better educated, has more experience, etc., than the "average American".   This willful ignorance that the the Republicans have portrayed as a virtue is vile.

Agreed.
What scares me is that both McCain and Palin make no effort to inform themselves at all, even on the topics that they talk about in their speeches. We've already noted McCain's ignorance about the difference between a planetarium projector and an overhead projector. Sarah Palin, in her first policy speech, spoke about the need for more government backed research in autism and other children's disorders. Then she went on to say this......

Quote
“Where does a lot of that earmark money end up anyway? … some of these pet projects they really don’t make a whole lot of sense and sometimes these dollars go to projects that have little or nothing to do with the public good. Things like fruit fly research in Paris, France. I kid you not.”


A little research by Palin, or her speech writers, would have revealed just how imporant fruit fly research is, particularly in autism and other children's disorders.  Huh?

One movie title that comes to mind when I read about McCain and Palin is "Dumb and Dumber."

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